Author Topic: Scrappyard Aliaga & Alang  (Read 8585 times)

Offline Pieter_Inpijn

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Scrappyard Aliaga & Alang
« on: November 28, 2005, 07:06:31 AM »
Hello,

we all know that a large number of ships are scrapped at Aliaga or Alang. But I am curious about what happens with the scrapp-iron? It must be a huge quantity. Is it transported back to ironworks and how? Are harbours closeby to ship it in bulkercarriers back to Japan / USA / Europe?
And what happens with all the furniture and "art works" from the scrapped ferries and cruiseships? I never see any ad's for such things.

Regards

Pieter
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Offline Wojtek

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Re: Scrappyard Aliaga & Alang
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2005, 07:49:43 AM »
Hi,

As I know many of parts from scrapped vessels are to be sold. Especially furnitures and "art works", machinery as well.

Try to type "alang" in Google or sth. I remember I have found once such a side with a lot of offers.

Regards,
Wojtek

Offline Phil English

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Re: Scrappyard Aliaga & Alang
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2005, 09:19:19 AM »
With regard to the major demolition areas - Bangladesh and India - the scrap metal is sold to local steel mills for domestic use.

Turkey (Aliaga) is a minor player and I'm not sure what happens there.

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Phil

Offline Ilhan Kermen

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Re: Scrappyard Aliaga & Alang
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2005, 11:29:51 PM »
There are some steel mills in Aliaga and Nemrut bays in Izmir
like this company (http://www.izdemir.com.tr/ingilizce/indexyenieng.htm)
These scrap metals ships or imported scraps used for reproduce steel products.A pair of for domestic use a big pair export to South Asia and Far Eastern countries.
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Offline hamburgbug

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Re: Scrappyard Aliaga & Alang
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2005, 11:27:06 PM »
A wonderful book that describes this process in great detail: The Outlaw Sea by William Langewiesche.
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Offline Oneil

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Re: Scrappyard Aliaga & Alang
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2005, 09:35:09 PM »
I was wondering that if the scrap price for the passenger ships is the same for all of them..i tried to reserach this but came across very different numbers for different passenger ships as well as quite different from cargo ship scrap prices..wud like to know if any of you guys have some info..thanks
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Offline Phil English

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Re: Scrappyard Aliaga & Alang
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2005, 10:44:25 PM »
The demolition market is rather volatile and prices can vary considerably from week to week. There are many factors that can influence prices including location, type, build quality, engine serviceability, and domestic demand for scrap metal. It's certainly not unusual at the moment for scrappers to pay $350-400/ldt for a high-quality tanker and only $150-200/ldt for a 'dead ship' ferry on an 'as is' basis. A well-maintained, serviceable ferry, on the other hand, may command a higher price, should supply/demand factors be favourable.

Bangladesh has been the No.1 player for the best part of this year with prices for tankers (the preferred vessel type) hovering around the $400/ldt mark. This is very much a historical high, largely due to a dearth of tonnage available. India has been playing second fiddle and has not been able to compete with Bangladesh for much of the year and has turned to less conventional (as far as scrappers are concerned) vessels  such as passenger ships, reefers and trawlers. These are of little interest to Bangladesh and therefore the 'big bucks' money tends to elude this segment of the market.

I have loads of statistics and price trend data available at work on this very subject. If you are really interested in this area, and it's only for your own personal interest, I can forward some data to you by email.

Cheers
Phil

Offline Oneil

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Re: Scrappyard Aliaga & Alang
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2005, 05:15:19 PM »
Thanks for your email Phil..I am actually quite interested to know more about it and wud appreciate if u cud send me the data at [email protected]
Thanks !
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Offline Oneil

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Re: Scrappyard Aliaga & Alang
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2005, 05:17:52 PM »
Thanks for your email Phil..I am actually quite interested to know more about it and wud appreciate if u cud send me the data at [email protected]
Thanks !
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Offline Reinier Meuleman

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Re: Scrappyard Aliaga & Alang
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2005, 07:39:35 AM »
Hello Pieter,

Regarding the scrap material here is what happens with the scap vessels. Upon arriving at Alang or othe places were vessels are scrapped, various contractore are bidding for all various parts, like old furniature, spare parts, engine parts, electronic part ferrous metals etc. These items will be resold as well as other parts which not mentioned. Complete aux engines are sold and removed in one piece. All srap steel is cut in big lumps on the vessel , than cut into smaller pieces and loaded onto lorries, which will transport the srap on bad roads to the furnaces and melted down, mostly used for iron bar manaufactury of sent to other steel mills for adding the scrap with iron ore and the cycle is complete.

Regards

Reinier Meuleman
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