Author Topic: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang  (Read 10241 times)

Offline Charles McAllister

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France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« on: January 09, 2007, 12:32:14 AM »
This video trailer was just uploaded today.  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgdPG1gTwwg&NR

Sad scenes at Alang now.  I wonder if there is really any chance she can be saved, or if the Indian High Court's postponement of a decision until March is  simply a tactic intended to allow time for publicity to fade away.  I read some reports claiming that India would not allow the Dubai group to revive the ship because that would make India look bad.  Very sad, indeed, if a once-great ship is allowed to be broken up because of misplaced national pride.
Best,

Charles

Offline Phil Ciborowski

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2007, 12:49:10 AM »
That is great video...  the documentary looks very nice as well.

yesterday 3 bodies were found in a ship of workers that had been missing for a month... im sure that news like this will keep things focused on how things are done over there.

Offline Glenn Towler

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2007, 01:03:30 AM »
I don't see how india can block the ship going to the dubai group.  If the Indian High Court orders the ship out of Indian waters and returned to it previous owners Star Cruises and they then sell the ship to the Dubai Group.

So I am told there is also some action underway in Germany, that if the Indian High Court orders the ship out could see the ship being returned to Germany where the German Government are coping some flak with regards to the ship leaving in the first place.

Oh well we shall have to wait till March now to in theory find out her fate.
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Offline Phil Ciborowski

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2007, 07:41:03 AM »
I hope that NCL really gets screwed for this, but they wont. They have lied and have acted very "under the table" in their dealings about this ship... and now the real sad thing is they own a national historic landmark (the United States) which needs TLC bad, as she is rusting away, but if nothing is done soon, she too will end up on that beach...

And just recently they had her ownership papers transfered so that she is no longer registered in the us... i only can only imagine what that means.

Offline marc reynaert

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2007, 09:44:23 AM »
Greetings,
I've seen that video,i think it is very sad to see a vessel like that will turn into scrap.Afther her many years of service.
What i hate the most is,the way that it will be done,on a beach in Alang.Where people are working in conditions,that
we cannot think of.Also the pollusion to the enviroment.This should be stopped,many years the company's making handsfull of profit,and on the end,they dont pay off to a proper way of scrapping these vessels.On a scrapcompany like that,people get killed in no time.They get almost no money,and they have to work likes slaves,and if they get killed in a accident,the family who's left behind,get no money at all,if they are lucky they can stay on the company's ground to live further in poverty.
Get these company's to court,and lett them pay off.
Regards
Marc
inlandvessels i like.

Offline Glenn Towler

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2007, 12:54:36 PM »
I thought that there way some document in place that protected the United States from a fate similair to the France/Norway/Blue Lady?

I guess we can only hope that these grand ships can be saved from the scrapers tourch.
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Offline Phil Ciborowski

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2007, 05:53:27 PM »
Yea that would be the Federal Gov't designation as a nastional historic landmark...the way around that is to register the ship outside the US, which NCL has just done.

Offline Brent

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2007, 10:51:05 PM »
The Blue Lady continues to sit high and dry at Alang while various parties try to work out how to handle the estimated 700 tons of toxic material (asbestos) still on board her. Following report from Fairplay this week:

NEW DELHI 07 September – India's supreme court has banned entry of contaminated ships to its shores, giving a final jolt to the Alang-Sosiya ship demolition yards in Gujarat, once the world's largest breaking centre. The court also ordered a complete ban on burning any hazardous or non-hazardous material on the beach. The order follows a long-pending petition that sought a ban on breaking of the passenger liner Blue Lady, ex-Norway. The court has asked New Delhi to formulate a comprehensive ship-breaking policy. Blue Lady, which was beached in August, 2006 for demolition, is still awaiting a court order to start breaking. It was bogged down by controversy for over a year, with several organisations including Greenpeace opposing its demolition in India because of the toxic materials onboard. A senior shipbreaker said the industry is dying as the government has failed to offer any incentives. So far in 2007, only 50 small-sized ships have came to Alang for demolition, against over 300 ships in previous years.
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Jim Winsor 53

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2007, 02:24:48 AM »
The ship is dying.It is suffering a slow agonizing death.A fate worse than TITANIC.At least TITANIC is resting peacefully on the bottom some numerious miles down.NORWAY or BLUE LADY as she is called these days I guess is suffering at the hands of man not the way a gracefull liner such as this should see her end.At least she could have been taken out and sunk for a reef or taken near the TITANIC site and put to rest there.I think any way. :-(  :-(  :-(

Offline Phil English

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2007, 08:17:26 AM »
Marc,

It sounds like you've been reading too much Greenpeace propaganda  :-o

Take a look here:

http://www.sriaindia.com/safety_measures.html

The whole pollution, asbestos, etc issue is over-hyped by activists who have a clear political agenda. Don't be fooled.  :-x

Phil

Offline Reinier Meuleman

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2007, 08:43:45 AM »
Hi Phil

I fully agree with you about the stupidity of Greenpeace and their ignorent followers

Regards

Reinier Meuleman
Hobbies, aerial pictures, shipping pictures in general.

Offline Derell Licht

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2007, 08:22:15 PM »
In either case, it looks as though India is preparing to proceed with breaking her up...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/6988763.stm

Partial quote:
"A former ocean liner can be broken up in India despite concerns it contains toxic waste, the Supreme Court says.

The judgement came after experts were asked to decide if it was safe to scrap the Blue Lady at the giant breaking yard at Alang in western Gujarat state. "
Not all those who wander are lost...

Offline Brent

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2007, 07:30:54 PM »
From Lloyds List this week:

Greenlight India says Blue Lady can be scrapped
Shirish Nadkarni Mumbai
Wednesday 12 September 2007
INDIA’s Supreme Court has thrown a lifeline to the Ship Recycling Industries’ Association with yesterday’s decision to permit the demolition of Blue Lady, the controversial Norwegian cruiseship, writes Shirish Nadkarni in Mumbai.

“It would have been a huge predicament for us if the apex court had ruled against dismantling the ship,” said SRIA president Vishnu Gupta. “If the judges had handed down a decision against its recycling, the Blue Lady would have had to stay permanently at Alang, since it would have been almost impossible to float it again.”

The cruiseship, last owned by Malaysia’s Star Cruises, dropped anchor at Alang in August 2006 (see picture, above). During the course of the year, it has slid gradually out to sea and now lies nearly 1,500 ft from shore “making it almost impossible to move it”, Mr Gupta said.

Environmental organisations, including Greenpeace, obtained a stay order on the 46,000 dwt vessel’s demolition on the grounds that it carried more than 900 tonnes of toxic waste, such as asbestos and polychlorinated butyls, putting at risk the health of poorly equipped workers at the world’s largest shipbreaking yard.

The case against the Blue Lady hit the Supreme Court in June 2006, when the judges had allowed the vessel to enter Indian waters but ruled that it remain anchored off the coast of Gujarat until a final decision on the legal battle between environmentalists on the one side, and the ship’s owner and the Indian shipbreaking industry on the other.

The court appointed an expert committee to provide guidelines on how to safely dismantle all ships that come to India. The committee ended up recommending that certain procedures be followed to ensure worker safety, including decontamination before the breaking down of the ship, as well as proper disposal of any toxic waste.

“Since the court has accepted the technical expert committee report, we permit the Blue Lady to be dismantled,” said Supreme Court judge S H Kapadia. “The dismantling of the ship must be overseen by the district collector [the senior-most bureaucrat in the district].”

Mr Gupta claimed that the 25-year-old industry at Alang would have been faced with certain extinction if the Blue Lady decision had not gone in its favour. He said it could still die if the government failed to offer better incentives.

Greenpeace continues to assert that Indian demolition yards like Alang lack the technology to safely handle toxic waste in the ships they scrap. A 2005 report said that thousands of workers in the shipbreaking industry in countries like India, China and Pakistan may have died over the past two decades due to exposure to toxic waste or in accidents during the cutting up of vessels.
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Offline locarno

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2007, 01:00:59 PM »
Hi,
by any chance does any one have any new pictures to post. has the cutting actually now begun?
thank you
Daniel

Offline Kier Shackleton Gigeroff

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Re: France/Norway/Blue Lady video at Alang
« Reply #14 on: November 09, 2007, 03:23:42 PM »
Very sad story indeed. Really idiotic that they will commence with the scrapping of this vessel if it does in fact contain hundreds of tonnes of toxic waste. And if Greenpeace and other such environmental groups are "stupid" (as stated by one of our members), there still would be a possibility that there is toxic waste on board (I don't see what's so hard to believe about that) - it should be further investigated. Peoples lives are at stake.

I think that working at Alang would be just about one of the worst jobs in the world, but I guess they cannot work anywhere  else. I think that unsafe ship-scrapping should be banned, and yards such as Alang can either conform to new international safety standards or go out of business.

I always find it sad to see ships be broken up, and if I had my way they would all be made into museums, but then there would be a hell of a lot of museums out there.

Kier