Author Topic: Questions regarding Age of Exploration Ships and missions.  (Read 2584 times)

Offline david77

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Questions regarding Age of Exploration Ships and missions.
« on: April 30, 2019, 10:44:33 AM »
Hello everyone,

I am working on a project that is inspired by the age of exploration, specifically the long expeditions such as the discovery of the sea route to India or the discovery of the new world. But I am finding it very hard to find information about what was the usual number of crewmen, their roles, how many ships were usually involved, what were some problems these types of missions had to overcome, etc. If anyone could point me in the right direction I'd appreciate it greatly.

« Last Edit: May 30, 2019, 02:54:01 PM by david77 »

Offline thinkappleten

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Re: Questions regarding Age of Exploration Ships and missions.
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2021, 07:15:47 AM »
The so-called Age of Exploration was a period from the early 15th century and continuing into the early 17th century, during which European ships were traveled around the world to search for new trading routes and partners to feed burgeoning capitalism in Europe. In the process, Europeans encountered peoples and mapped lands previously unknown to them. Among the most famous explorers of the period were Christopher Columbus, Vasco da Gama, Pedro Álvares Cabral, John Cabot, Juan Ponce de León, and Ferdinand Magellan.


Offline mandelvid

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Re: Questions regarding Age of Exploration Ships and missions.
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2022, 08:57:12 PM »
Sailors used several types of ships in this age of exploration, including the caravel and the carrack. The caravel was developed specifically for long-distance trade by Prince Henry the Navigator from Portugal.

Offline AndyL

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Re: Questions regarding Age of Exploration Ships and missions.
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2022, 04:59:18 AM »
The ships of the Age of Discovery were much smaller that one might imagine. During a visit to a full-size operational replica of one such ship, I overheard someone complaining that the replica was not full-size as it was not at all like what they had seen in films! The web sites of such replica ships will probably have information as to their original operation and crews. The early voyages of discovery were probably made by ships crewed in a fashion similar to the merchantmen of the day. One important member was the carpenter who could fashion new masts or other needed parts. The Wikipedia article on Columbus' Santa Maria has a detailed listing of the crew and their roles.

 

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