ShipSpotting.com
Login: Lost Password? SIGN UP
Ship Photo Search
Advanced Search
Pages: 1 ... 6 7 [8]
  Print  
Author Topic: Six Dead After COSTA CONCORDIA Runs Aground  (Read 48413 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
kasco
Quite a regular
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 68


View Profile
« Reply #105 on: January 21, 2012, 02:40:27 pm »

What I wondering a little

there were seemingly no black outs (that,s correct, total loss of power I mean). The vessel was lighted on the rocks as far as I know.
If there was power,, those ships have rather powerfull bow and stern thrusters. With those
in operation the Capt could have easy over come 12 kn wind. Somehow it does not fit unless he really intentionally beached the vessel because he realized that she will capsize.

That would be interesting to know.

Capt: If there was power, why not beach her bow in?





Report to moderator   Logged
holedrille
Just can't stay away
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 118


View Profile
« Reply #106 on: January 21, 2012, 08:59:14 pm »

The captain has stated in 'judicial documents' that when he saw foam ahead (the old fashioned method of telling that your end is nigh) he put the helm hard to the right but the ship still hit the Le Scole rocks. Crew sent to the engine room reported that water was rushing in. and passenger reports state that a complete power failure occurred at the time of impact. The animated sequence that follows shown so dramatically on the AIS plot on another thread shows the ship progressively loosing speed from that moment (20.44) on until coming to a stop at 21.03 some 2 km on. This surely indicates that there was no propulsion power from the time of the impact and she was moving solely under the influence of inertia.
The plot on reply no 100 shows a 12kn NNE wind, which, acting on the higher front of the ship, would explain the turn to starboard with no further forward movement. The ship then moves largely sideways towards the shore at a knot or less, exactly as you would expect such a large windage vessel to do, and exactly in line with the wind direction, until impact with the shore at 21.54. The videos taken from the shore after grounding show a lot of lighting working, a list of no more than 20 degrees, and all the starboard lifeboats on their davits, but it is not too clear how much the ship had sunk by then. The captain had meanwhile called for tugs assistance, implying he had no propulsion power. He presumably had assessed that the ship was sinking, otherwise he would have simply dropped the anchor and waited for assistance. I cannot believe that the crew drove the ship sideways on to the shore using side thrusters.
After grounding, and before daybreak, the ship increased the list from 20 to 70 degrees, where she has been ever since. The charts spot depth closest to the ship suggest a water depth of 62, presumably metres, which would be enough for the ship to almost totally disappear, so the worries about her slipping off the rocks seem very real and will complicate salvage/ dismantling. Can anyone confirm the depth of the sand and mud bottom in that area?
So it seems to me that 4200 persons lives were saved, not by any action of the crew, but by the fortunate existence of a 12 knot NNE wind. Without that, we might have been looking at headlines stating 'LOSS OF LIFE EXCEEDS THAT OF THE TITANIC'.
Holedriller
Report to moderator   Logged
Robert Smith
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,695



View Profile
« Reply #107 on: January 21, 2012, 10:19:26 pm »

Your assumption is underlined by the following very interesting live plot.

Brgds,
Rob.

http://www.qps.nl/download/attachments/6718686/Grounding+Costa+Concordia.wmv?version=2&modificationDate=1326885071126

Report to moderator   Logged
MarineWeather
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 3



View Profile WWW
« Reply #108 on: January 25, 2012, 05:51:33 am »

Thses two reconstructions are pretty interesting too:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpjy5fvTqpI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxrEEpIs2iM
Report to moderator   Logged

MarineWeather.eu
Michal-S
Not too shy to talk
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 39



View Profile
« Reply #109 on: January 25, 2012, 06:18:20 am »

Hi,does anybody know if Costa Concordia was equipped with MES (Maritime Evacuation System-kind of glide, as installed on all passenger planes)? No picture of her indicates it to be deployed.
Report to moderator   Logged
Kai R
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 152


View Profile
« Reply #110 on: January 25, 2012, 07:51:43 am »

I cannot believe that the crew drove the ship sideways on to the shore using side thrusters.
After grounding, and before daybreak, the ship increased the list from 20 to 70 degrees, where she has been ever since.
I completely agree with your assessment. Two additional facts fit in:

To my knowledge, the emergency generators wouldn`t even supply enough electricity to feed the thrusters. They are energy consuming monsters. So it was just current and wind moving the ship to shore.

The infrared-videos show the Costa Concordia lying completely on her side, in a 90 degree angle. Later she must have slipped and come to rest in her current 60 - 70 degree angle.

Regards

Kai
Report to moderator   Logged
peterredd
Quite a regular
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 66


View Profile
« Reply #111 on: January 25, 2012, 11:15:17 am »

Have a read

UPDATE 1.15pm: THE captain of the stricken Costa Concordia liner told a friend shortly after the disaster that he sailed too close to shore because a manager from the cruise company pressured him to do so.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/more-news/costa-concordia-captain-claims-he-was-pressured-by-boss/story-fn7x8me2-1226253144825
« Last Edit: January 25, 2012, 11:18:59 am by peterredd » Report to moderator   Logged

Just love ships
Captain Ted
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8,954



View Profile WWW
« Reply #112 on: January 25, 2012, 04:13:42 pm »

guys

if you read my post entire and not in snippets

I said """ I dont, quite understand ""  and ""If there was power"""

now it is stated that the power was totally gone,, that leaves the question, why that,, beside the emergency generator they do not have only one auxillery engine and to my knowledge (correct me if I am wrong) those auxillery engines are not all in the main engine room,,just for such cases.
so somehow it is all a kind of murky. that the Master (and all other masters on passenger ships) was under extreme pressure to give the Passengers a show,,that is nothing new.
Report to moderator   Logged

NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
mooringman
Just can't stay away
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 139


View Profile
« Reply #113 on: January 25, 2012, 11:05:06 pm »

Have a read

UPDATE 1.15pm: THE captain of the stricken Costa Concordia liner told a friend shortly after the disaster that he sailed too close to shore because a manager from the cruise company pressured him to do so.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/more-news/costa-concordia-captain-claims-he-was-pressured-by-boss/story-fn7x8me2-1226253144825

So what?....The captain is anyway responsible for the accident,the people on board and the vessel.But I'm sure,the company knew about this and will be responsible too,even in Italy!
Report to moderator   Logged
peterredd
Quite a regular
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 66


View Profile
« Reply #114 on: January 26, 2012, 12:56:12 am »

Have a read

UPDATE 1.15pm: THE captain of the stricken Costa Concordia liner told a friend shortly after the disaster that he sailed too close to shore because a manager from the cruise company pressured him to do so.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/more-news/costa-concordia-captain-claims-he-was-pressured-by-boss/story-fn7x8me2-1226253144825

So what?....The captain is anyway responsible for the accident,the people on board and the vessel.But I'm sure,the company knew about this and will be responsible too,even in Italy!

I was just stating that this seemed normal procedure as no one seemed to Question the route, at least no one on the bridge questioned the move...
Report to moderator   Logged

Just love ships
Captain Ted
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8,954



View Profile WWW
« Reply #115 on: January 26, 2012, 01:07:41 am »

There is nowadays a magic solution (thats what IMO and pencil pushers think) It,s called bridge management team
It supposed to work that way, that the master consults his officers on the route, everyone gives his input and than decide as a TEAM,, but when it goes wrong they hang the MASTER anyhow.
Question really is in this accident, where and who and what did the other officers on the bridge do. did they voice concerns or just as normal,,the MASTER says therefore all ok. I for one in my carriere, now 28 years master, never had an officer who said,,wait a moment Mr Captain,,  Bridge Team Management therefore is a joke,, but of course that does not explain why that happened. also not when it is true (where I would not wonder) that Costa line and also other pax-lines push Masters to give their paxe a show.
It is as usual,,you can do everything as long nothing goes wrong, the moment that is,,you are dead meat,,and that from all sides.
Thats the sad truth in this matters
Report to moderator   Logged

NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
Ian Horsfall
Quite a regular
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 56


View Profile
« Reply #116 on: January 26, 2012, 03:22:13 am »

Hi Peterred, I just find it very difficult to believe that, at 9.41 some Manager calls a Captain , Hey steer your ship close to the shore give the Passengers a treat, any one that cruises Knows that the 2nd meal is under way and the 1st dinner seating is at the Show.Not many sight seeing over the side.
I realise  you are only reporting what the press says. Schettino is trying to cover his tracks. Nobody is reporting who was on the bridge.our news has the cook making Supper for him and abroad at 10.30 pm go figure.Sad situation for a lot of families.
Report to moderator   Logged
Tuomas Romu
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 300


View Profile
« Reply #117 on: January 26, 2012, 03:52:43 am »

beside the emergency generator they do not have only one auxillery engine and to my knowledge (correct me if I am wrong) those auxillery engines are not all in the main engine room,,just for such cases.

The ship has six main generators, but the RINA database entry states that there are seven generators. Does anyone here know if the seventh is the emergency diesel generator, or a smaller auxiliary generator for harbour use? I would assume that, with a ship as big as that, one main generator could run at sufficient power level (i.e. not too low) when the ship is at port without passengers.

As for the layout, I think the ship had two engine rooms (3+3 generators). However, as she was not built to the latest standards (safe return to port), they might have been side-by-side with no watertight bulkhead in between.
Report to moderator   Logged
Mats
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 785


View Profile
« Reply #118 on: January 26, 2012, 02:31:42 pm »

New pictures of the vessel listing before tipping over have emerged:
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/01/26/costa-concordia-cruise-liner-pictures-lifeboast_n_1233035.html



« Last Edit: January 26, 2012, 02:38:16 pm by Mats » Report to moderator   Logged
itsfoto
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 281



View Profile
« Reply #119 on: January 27, 2012, 03:42:31 pm »

How close is too close?

Take a look at these pictures:
http://www.napolidavivere.it/2012/01/20/navi-da-crociera-inchino-faraglioni-capri/
of the Seven Seas Voyager on the south coast of the Isle of Capri.

I understand they are from a video taken in 2006.

greetings
Uwe
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: 1 ... 6 7 [8]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Page created in 0.058 seconds with 19 queries.
Copyright © 2010 All rights reserved