ShipSpotting.com
Login: Lost Password? SIGN UP
Ship Photo Search
Advanced Search
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: spotting is an (almost) lethal hobby  (Read 3490 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Stan Muller
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8,123



View Profile WWW
« on: May 13, 2010, 08:31:06 pm »

Some people spot trains and do not realize that shipspotting is better for your health
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8fasGcAi6Q
I hope he had his shot!

Don't try this at home.

rgds Stan
Report to moderator   Logged
Henry Pattison
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 721


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2010, 06:57:52 am »

Clean pants required!
Report to moderator   Logged
Jesper T Andersen
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 447



View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2010, 10:39:34 am »

Clean pants required !!
Also for me please., This must be 100 % lucky man, i dont photograph underwater when i see this sign on a ship "Beware Of Propeller"

Have a nice weekend.

Jesper
 :-)  :-)  :-)
Report to moderator   Logged

Magogman
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5,355


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2010, 02:27:32 am »

That guy was just plain lucky - his head must have been in a cloud of nostalgia with that steam loco.  If he was an experienced train photographer he should have known that a train might be coming on the other tracks.  I have photographed thousands of trains and get close to the tracks but not that close. Wow!  Great photography -- nice steam loco.  Those things move a lot faster than ships! :-D
Jtaship wrote:
Clean pants required !!
Also for me please., This must be 100 % lucky man, i dont photograph underwater when i see this sign on a ship "Beware Of Propeller"

Have a nice weekend.

Jesper
      [/quote]
Report to moderator   Logged

My blog with narrative and more photos is located at:
http://magogman.blogspot.com

read the introduction and also there are about 5 different blogs of ships and railroads
Daniel Bérubé
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 385


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2010, 05:34:03 pm »

A large mass of air pushed aside by that fast moving train may simply have taken him away from the tracks?
Report to moderator   Logged
Gerolf Drebes
Photo Administrator
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11,321



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2010, 07:49:53 am »

Hi Stan,
funny video, but to be honest, also shipspotting is a risky hobby as well. I heard from a shiplover, who was in jail because he took pictures in forbidden areas.
I was surprised while taking a shot by a huge wave with the legs completey wet after the wave. And at Ghent I went back to get the full ship on the photo and trapped in a whole injuring heavily my knee.
But I am still alive luckily.
Gerolf
Report to moderator   Logged

......
Cody Williams
Webmaster
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1,112



View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2010, 08:18:34 am »

Heres an extreme of trying to get the best shot! (I know they're not taking photos but geez, how crazy!)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/war22/366318415/sizes/o/
Report to moderator   Logged

I can be contacted at cody@shipspotting.com
Stan Muller
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8,123



View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2010, 12:59:02 pm »

Hi Cody,

That, indeed is an exterme situation.
Last week I witnessed a similair situation while spotting and made this photo:http://www.shipspotting.com/modules/myalbum/photo-1115969-Ludwigshafen+Express
note the pilot / captain on the bridge and the tiny boat before the bow. There was a lot of horn blowing.

Another example of a dare devil can be seen here:
http://www.shipspotting.com/modules/myalbum/photo.php?lid=664390
This photo is shot by Dirk van Laer and he made several shot on different dates of this lunatic, that happens to be .....ME!

But I am still alive, besides occasional wet feet.

rgds Stan
Report to moderator   Logged
Fotojoe
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 294


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2010, 12:17:23 pm »

well, if you leave Hamburg or Le Havre or other ports on a nice and sunny afternoon in Summer, especially on Saturday or Sunday , no wind, it's always a lot of entertainment with port and starboard rudder manoeuvres and horn-blowing to warn drunken....sailors and shipspotters aiming for most spectacular pictures...   8-)  .  The problem is that, even if they drift around somewhere close to the fairway, you cannot ignore them or sink a family just by your vsl swell.
Report to moderator   Logged
Morten
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 301


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2010, 10:31:25 pm »

When in China, this sort of close encounters is every day business! We often had to simply "push through" a mass of fishing vessels because the clusters of vessels are so massive and right in the middle of the sailing channel (because that is where the fish are) that going around simply isn't an option. This is especially nerve wracking at night, as these small vessels only turn on their lights as they sort of move to facilitate our passage.

I (along with every other navigator who have ever sailed in china) have to admit that I have no idea if I've missed all of them, but we try our best.

I have a few pictures of these clusters (sometimes, they are so compact that they look like one solid object on the radar) but the quality of the pictures is abysmal, so I won't bother you guys with them.

Making it even more interesting is the fact that asian folklore will have it that the wake of a ship is haunted with evil spirits and the only way to rid yourself of these spirits (ensuring a safe and prosperous journey) is to have another ship "cut" your wake as close behind the vessel as possible. This involves scaring the living daylights out of the poor OOW when they start sailing parallel to your vessel only to disappear a few hundred meters ahead of your bow. Then you just have to hope and pray that they appear on the other side!  :-o
And it doesn't help to try and alter course, because they'll just start hunting you...

So trading east Asia requires an icey stomach and "a pair" made of titanium! :-D
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Page created in 0.048 seconds with 19 queries.
Copyright © 2010 All rights reserved