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Author Topic: How many ULCC's are presently in service?  (Read 6615 times)
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Daniel Carlsson
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« on: November 27, 2009, 12:46:17 pm »

I'm wondering how many ULCC's there are in service at this present time. I only know five of them.
These are:

FSO Knock Nevis.
TI Europe.
TI Oceania.
FSO Asia (Ex. TI Asia).
TI Africa (will soon become FSO Africa).

If you want you may fill in the list.

Thank you and best regards.

/Daniel
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Daniel Carlsson
Ian Thomas
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« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2009, 05:58:02 pm »

A few more for you Daniel, all these still in service as FSO's or FPSO's

BAOBAB IVOIRIEN MV10 - 1976 ex TINA
 
BW NISA - 1983 ex NISA

FPSO FLUMINENSE - 1974 ex SEA SAINT

FSO CIDADE DE MACAE MV15 - 1979 ex UST PACIFIC

YUUM K'AK' NAAB - 1981 ex BERGE ENTERPRISE

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Ian Thomas
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rjan Halvorsen
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« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2009, 07:42:07 pm »

Hi Daniel.

One more is the FSO Belokamenka (ex Berge Pioneer) built 1980,  360700  dwt.

Brgds
rjan
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John Jones
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« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2009, 10:33:41 pm »

The ten largest tankers still in service as such (not having been converted for other use) are:

TI OCEANA 441,585DWT BUILT 2003 DAEWOO
TI EUROPE 441,561DWT BUILT 2002 DAEWOO
BW NISA 322,911DWT BUILT 1983 SOLISNOR
PHOENIX VANGUARD 321,300DWT BUILT 2007 DAEWOO
ANDROMEDA 321,300DWT BUILT 2008 DAEWOO
ELEKTRA GLORY 321,300DWT BUILT 2009 DAEWOO
MARAN CANOPUS 320,472DWT BUILT 2007 DAEWOO
MARAN CAPRICORN 320,472DWT BUILT 2008 DAEWOO
YOUNARA GLORY 320,050DWT BUILT 2004 DAEWOO
ARIES VOYAGER 320,000DWT BUILT 2006 DAEWOO
So only two true ULCC's left! Who remembers the Batillus, Bellamya, Pierre Guillaumat series of 500,000 tonners?

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John J.
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rondavies
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« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2009, 04:57:56 pm »

Kome Kribi 1 ...ex Companion/Stena Companion/Hansa Vega/Sea Song is working as an FSO off Cameroon. Believe the former Juno ex Vanja still exists in similar sort of operation. The Kockum 350 type still remarkably well represented with also the cut down Stavros GL rebuilt into a drydock in China.  

Cheers, Ron
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Daniel Carlsson
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« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2009, 09:56:44 am »

So there's actually only two real ULCC's left?
I guess that the need for these big vessels is not that big today then.
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Daniel Carlsson
rondavies
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« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2009, 11:02:45 am »

Using the old definition for a ULCC...yes, just two in service. The owner wouldn't thank you for calling them by that term though...they changed their description to V-Plus a few years ago as the old ULCC term was considered associated with old, steam turbine, single hullers built in the 70's and obsolete. The running costs are based on using them as  2 million barrel VLCCs with the bonus of using the extra space if the charterers are looking for it...hence V Plus. Sadly, the ULCC really is dead!

Ron.
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John Jones
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« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2009, 10:40:20 pm »

....And will the ULBC's (ultra large box carriers) prove to be a similar folly? There are plenty more to be delivered yet. And many of the ones that have already been delivered are drifting around 'ultra-slow steaming' just to keep themselves occupied! The owners cite the ecological benefits of doing such. But why build a ship designed to do 25 knots unless you intended to utilise it at that speed? They are struggling for excuses.
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John J.
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Phil English
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« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2009, 11:03:49 pm »

Agreed John. Let's also not forgrt the Q-Max LNG carriers which have had extended period of idleness since delivery. They have been occasionally running part cargoes but the inflexibility of the huge design means that they can only call at a limited number of terminals. The US business for which they were built has considerably slackened off and one wonders what the future holds for them.

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Phil
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Morten
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« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2009, 05:17:40 pm »

I'm not sure the Box carriers will share the faith of the ULCCs - at least not to the same extent! The demise of the ULCCs was due to the lack of terminals which could accomodate the huge vessels and their huge amount of cargo.
The container vessels are slow steaming, not because they are obsolete, but because it is the best way to save money. There might be a large over capacity in the market right now, but in due time, smaller and less economic vessels will disappear and then the capacity will fit the market. The infrastructure is there to support the super box carriers, so if anything, I think we'll see smaller container vessels give way to super carriers as it is far more economic to use the large vessels.
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rondavies
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« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2009, 12:27:34 am »

hi again

Here's another surviving ULCC, the SAFER, ex Esso Japan, which works as the FPSO for Ras Isa Terminal in Yemen...409000 dwt. Saw her on maiden voyage in 1976 at Rotterdam. Odd bow shape, cylindrical..almost barge like.

Cheers
Ron
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