ShipSpotting.com
Login: Lost Password? SIGN UP
Ship Photo Search
Advanced Search
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 [7] 8 9 10
  Print  
Author Topic: Cameras and Photography Advice Forum  (Read 191296 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Pier Master
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 273



View Profile WWW
« Reply #90 on: August 06, 2015, 07:15:05 am »

Thanks Paul. That'll teach me to be more careful in the future.

Regards, Brian AKA The Pier Master.
Report to moderator   Logged

Blistering barnacles...
Christian
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,536



View Profile
« Reply #91 on: September 04, 2015, 03:46:41 pm »

Hello,

has anyone tried Nikon P600 with the super zoom???

How is it for shipspotting ? Smiley
Report to moderator   Logged
lotty
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 14


View Profile
« Reply #92 on: November 06, 2015, 07:06:09 am »

I can understand the concept of a heavy camera being more controllable than something lightweight however I do think that if you are taking up to 1000 shots per day that the 5.5kg camera may be not so useful.

I used to have SLRS and have used my brothers DSLR with lenses but when travelling ease of carrying and spped to use plus zoom length are my main concerns.

Approaching Singapore or Sydney and going through the Suez Canal pulled that kind of number. Approaching many harbours at dawn also provided for hundreds of shots with fishing boats etc and the port making great atmospheric shots.

Wandering on deck for the interesting whale or distant ship etc was not a problem - which it may have been with 5kgs around the neck.

Lastly the Canon has effectively a 1200mm zoom which if you are trying to pull in distant ships or land is exceptionally useful. Normally I could name them well before anyone else with binoculars - not that was often a need as it is amazing how many people on cruises have no interest in ships. Bird watchers by the tens, ship enthusiasts by the thumb.




Hi I am considering changing from a standard DSLR (Canon) to a bridge type camera for shiping photos and also general photography as it would be much easyer to carry etc. Just wondered if anyone out here could give any pointers on which ones (makes etc) they are using. Can the pics be enlarged to A3 with good enough quality
Thanks
Report to moderator   Logged
Maersk Spotter
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 3



View Profile
« Reply #93 on: April 11, 2016, 05:49:40 pm »

Does anyone have any recommendations on how to set a Nikon D7200 for ship spotting? All too common do I end up getting the bow out of focus.
Report to moderator   Logged
pieter melissen
Photo Corrections
Home away from home
*****
Online Online

Posts: 273


View Profile WWW
« Reply #94 on: April 11, 2016, 05:55:50 pm »

Does anyone have any recommendations on how to set a Nikon D7200 for ship spotting? All too common do I end up getting the bow out of focus.

I suppose that a Canon works the same, so put the camera on Aperture priority, set it 7.1 at least and to ensure that your shutter times don't get too low, crank up the ISO a little, or more under darker circumstances.
Report to moderator   Logged
Maersk Spotter
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 3



View Profile
« Reply #95 on: April 11, 2016, 06:58:14 pm »

Does anyone have any recommendations on how to set a Nikon D7200 for ship spotting? All too common do I end up getting the bow out of focus.

I suppose that a Canon works the same, so put the camera on Aperture priority, set it 7.1 at least and to ensure that your shutter times don't get too low, crank up the ISO a little, or more under darker circumstances.

Thanks for your reply. What about metering? Matrix, Spot, or Center Weighted? And focus mode: AF-C, AF-S or AF-A. And last but not least, the focus area (how many squares). D9, D21, D51. 51 being 51 points of focus. I would assume 51 since I want everything in focus.

Report to moderator   Logged
pieter melissen
Photo Corrections
Home away from home
*****
Online Online

Posts: 273


View Profile WWW
« Reply #96 on: April 11, 2016, 07:09:04 pm »

Does anyone have any recommendations on how to set a Nikon D7200 for ship spotting? All too common do I end up getting the bow out of focus.

I suppose that a Canon works the same, so put the camera on Aperture priority, set it 7.1 at least and to ensure that your shutter times don't get too low, crank up the ISO a little, or more under darker circumstances.

Thanks for your reply. What about metering? Matrix, Spot, or Center Weighted? And focus mode: AF-C, AF-S or AF-A. And last but not least, the focus area (how many squares). D9, D21, D51. 51 being 51 points of focus. I would assume 51 since I want everything in focus.


I use one focus point, slightly lower than the center. It work for me quite well given the aperture value of 7.1.
Metering for me is spot, and make sure that when you have a black hull in the center, you have to manually under exposed otherwise the rest of the picture, for instance white superstructures in the sun get massively overexposed. Alternatively you meter the lighter parts of the picture and keep that value for the darker parts as well. White ships against a dark sky get more impressive if you underexpose too.   
Report to moderator   Logged
Jon Godsell
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 469


View Profile
« Reply #97 on: April 11, 2016, 07:49:44 pm »

It would help more if you could let us know what lens set up you have.  However, at this stage don't become wrapped up with all the settings as you will just confuse yourself even more.
I currently use a D800/D200 with three main lenses. In normal conditions I use speed priority and a speed of a 400th or more to ensure that lens shake is eliminated, especially with the lager lenses (80/400mm and 70/200mm) at the same time ensuring that the ISO is high enough to ensure edge to edge sharpness. In practice this means and ISO of 400 on dull low light days and less in bright spring/ summer days; with the shorter focal lenses an ISO 100 and a lower speed is quite feasible in most conditions. As for focusing, I usually keep the release down until the focus point locks on to the best point for my requirements.
The only real way of finding out though, is to use the basic settings until you find something that suits you, and practice, practice and practice again, before moving on to the more advanced settings.

Jon
Report to moderator   Logged
Maersk Spotter
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 3



View Profile
« Reply #98 on: April 13, 2016, 04:13:33 pm »

It would help more if you could let us know what lens set up you have.  However, at this stage don't become wrapped up with all the settings as you will just confuse yourself even more.
I currently use a D800/D200 with three main lenses. In normal conditions I use speed priority and a speed of a 400th or more to ensure that lens shake is eliminated, especially with the lager lenses (80/400mm and 70/200mm) at the same time ensuring that the ISO is high enough to ensure edge to edge sharpness. In practice this means and ISO of 400 on dull low light days and less in bright spring/ summer days; with the shorter focal lenses an ISO 100 and a lower speed is quite feasible in most conditions. As for focusing, I usually keep the release down until the focus point locks on to the best point for my requirements.
The only real way of finding out though, is to use the basic settings until you find something that suits you, and practice, practice and practice again, before moving on to the more advanced settings.

Jon

It would be a 18-140mm and a 300mm lens.
Report to moderator   Logged
Dеnis
Photo Administrator
Home away from home
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 301


View Profile
« Reply #99 on: August 06, 2016, 12:37:17 pm »

Hello, could anyone suggest me a "better camera"?    I bought mine SONY DCS-T300 back in 2008 just cause I needed "a small compact camera & that one looked cool & 10.1 Mpx with a 5x zoom seemed to be enough (for that time)".  It's the one I made & keep making all my ship pics...  But I never was fully satisfied with how the pics turn out - some were Ok, some were not as it's either the ship is too far away or on zoom-ins the pic looks "flat & grainy", couldn't make good enough shots indoor, etc. 
I'm still a n00b in terms of cameras - all I could do is pressing the button while having some simple settings.  So this time I'm buying a new one I need to be sure I didn't miss a better choice.   So what I'm looking for should be:
- compact camera (not a big thing with a special case for it)
- Mpx as much as possible
- greater zoom-ins with photo at such looking like the camera indeed got closer to the object, but not like if the normal pic got cropped & all the grain & haze & stuff visible at it's best.
- additional lens?
- great photos indoor even if the lighting is poor & flash not used
- long living battery
- preferably a touch-screen on the back
- photos looking "sharp & alive" as if done by a professional with a professional big camera.

Though if there's no compact pocket camera that can be that good, suggest anything else - the only thing I'm afraid here is that the camera + collection of lenses & other accessories would be too expensive & too much of stuff for me to carry.

Regards,
Denis
« Last Edit: August 06, 2016, 12:54:46 pm by Dеnis » Report to moderator   Logged
peter j. fitzpatrick
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 344

piraeus,perama and elevsina


View Profile
« Reply #100 on: August 06, 2016, 02:00:38 pm »

denis
what is your budget
peter
Report to moderator   Logged
pieter melissen
Photo Corrections
Home away from home
*****
Online Online

Posts: 273


View Profile WWW
« Reply #101 on: August 06, 2016, 02:30:37 pm »

http://www.digitaltrends.com/photography/image-sensor-size-matters/

read this first to avoid some disappointment. If a camera seller is trying to convince  you that a camera with more megpixels is better, just leave the shop.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2016, 02:38:07 pm by pieter melissen » Report to moderator   Logged
Dеnis
Photo Administrator
Home away from home
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 301


View Profile
« Reply #102 on: August 06, 2016, 05:23:55 pm »

I'm looking for camera that's under 20000 roubles (~275 Euros) or 15000 roubles.   I bought mine in 2008 for 14000 roubles - that's pretty expensive even now, just the camera was pretty new at that time. 
Anything you can suggest regarding the brand, model, country of making, etc.
Pieter, what's in that link is what I'd call "rocket science" as much of what's written there doesn't tell me anything.  I don't know anything in those theories, parameters, abbreviations, etc.   All I need is a suggestion list of "better cameras" & examples of what each can produce.  Having compared the "photos by this one look better than by that one" then I can decide & go looking for it in shops here.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2016, 05:32:14 pm by Dеnis » Report to moderator   Logged
ChasB46
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 850


View Profile
« Reply #103 on: August 06, 2016, 07:26:07 pm »

Why not try specific enthusiast site showing best cameras for uses. https://www.dpreview.com/buying-guides
Report to moderator   Logged
bendt nielsen
Not too shy to talk
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 28


Sletterhage Lighthouse, Aarhus Bay/Denmark


View Profile
« Reply #104 on: August 06, 2016, 08:18:20 pm »

Hej Denis, try to check this one with mega zoom.

https://www.dpreview.com/news/4034082826/canon-powershot-sx720-hs-boasts-new-40x-zoom-lens-with-a-compact-form-factor
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 [7] 8 9 10
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Page created in 0.056 seconds with 20 queries.
Copyright © 2010 All rights reserved