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Author Topic: Day at Ipswich/Felixstowe/Lowestoft & Gt Yarmouth  (Read 14449 times)
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Darren
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« on: January 02, 2008, 09:31:48 pm »

Over the Xmas period I decided to have a day out somewhere and following a bit of research on AIS and port websites I quickly ruled out the Humber ports due to access issues and lack of shipping so looked at Felixstowe and/or Yarmouth as they are only just under 2hrs drive from where I live.

Setting off at 06.45am I headed off to Ipswich and found the Westminster Dredging vessel Norma, Blue hulled passenger vessel Harmony II, Russian riversea ship Amur 2517, Trinity house vessel Alert and customs cutter Vigilant.  Access was via the yacht club and also Foxs marina, no hassle from any security.

Next port of call was Felixstowe where the Stena Britannica 2003/43487 was passing outwards, on berth were the following:-
Sea Energy 90/3332
Clementine Maersk 99/91921
MSC Michaela 02/73819
Sky Venus 83/33405
Maersk Kalamata 03/74656
Partnership 05/9981
Maersk Exporter 96/13017
Safmarine Europe 85/21887

Hansa India 97/37563 was inward and running for IRISL, she swung opposite the viewing area and proceeded to Landguard Terminal, the Suez Canal Bridge 02/68687 followed her in 40 minutes later.

There was nothing else scheduled to depart until 15.30hrs so I packed up and set off towards Lowestoft where I found quite a mixture of ships as follows:-

Shemara, which is a old luxury Yacht berthed on the Brook marine berth as was the former humber tug Keelman    now minus her wheelhouse and near sistership Riverman which was looking in a fair condition considering her age.  The former RNAS supply ship Dornoch was on the slipway in Lake Lothing, Oilman 69/352 was being worked on, people will recall her as the Pater which was berthed next to the Spithead Trader at Colchester.
There was a former customs cutter come converted tug named Defiant which looks to be at least 60s built berthed ahead of what looked to be some sort of converted RNAS barge.

Long term resident tug Maximus 54/141 is now looking in a dire condition having ben laid up for a number of years.

Southern Star 73/286 which is classed as a Survey ship had returned to its usual slot following a summer dry docking.

Fomer Coastguard vessel Confidante 89/137 was now showing Gardline Surveys as her new owners, ABP workboat Flat Holm 76/129 was tied up ahead of the Oilman.

Further down river the tug St Piran 60/306 was idle after ger arrival from Hull which she was apparently supposed to be used to tow cages of tuna overseas somewhere.  Astern of her the tug Gluvias (Ex St Gluvias) 59/207 was still undergoing work, preserved trawler Mincarlo 62/166 was astern of the Gluvias.

On the old shell base the usual collection of long termers were present in the shape of the Buoy Tenders KYE Torrent 70/495, Lorna 70/495 & Torch 80/560 along with 2 landing craft Ardennes L400177/1050 & Arakan L4003 78/1050.  Supply ship SPSL Sarah Service 73/965 was back in having spent a number of months in port.  She was rumoured to be towing the abovementioned ships to Nigeria but after months of speculation this never happened.

Felixarcs Gray Salvor was in port after arriving a few hours earlier from Great Yarmouth,  astern of her was the remains of the Scottish ex fishery vessel Sulisker which is now being cut down and converted into a luxury yacht.  Ahead of that was the standby ship Ocean Viscount    71/612 (Ex Cam Viscount).

I was rumbled by security when I took some shots of the preserved trawler Lydia Eva which was on the slipway awaiting some preservation work funded by the lottery.  I made a fast getaway and left the van in a haze of diesel smoke.

In the outer fish dock the small resident tug Planter 67/38 lay idle and had the Gray Vixen and Smit Spey as company.  And that concluded Lowestoft.

As there was a couple of hours still remaining I decided to call into Great Yarmouth to see what was about as there are a few craft involved in the outer harbour constuction project as follows:-

Rock Carrier Frans 73/1183, Flat barges Stemat 74 & 75, Dinopotes which looks like an accommodation barge with excavator, these were serviced by the Holyhead tugs Afon Las 82/182 & Afon Wen.

Supply ships in port consisted of the FD Invincible 06/2305, Sartor 76/2073, Smit Kamara 05/2588 &
Olympic Provider    04/2152.

There were 4 small survey ships and 1 tug moored up by the town bridge as follows:-  Celtic Warrior, Moidart, George D, Genesis and the Tug Herman SR.

The port dredger Admiral Day was also in port moored by the pilot office.

Further out to sea the dredger  Sand Fulmar was busy dredging aggregates.

All in all it was a pretty good day with 61 ships seen and most of them photographed.

I hope this has been of interest.

Darren
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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2008, 09:52:38 pm »

Hi Darren

I found it interesting and it just goes to show what can be achieved in a day  :-o

Regards

Steve Ellwood
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Darren
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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2008, 10:03:50 pm »

Glad to hear you enjoyed the trip report, it did involve a lot of driving but made a refreshing change to do all 4 ports in such a narrow period of daylight hours.

To think we used to do a 375 mile round trip all over the Humber ports in a day usually leaving at 05.30am and getting home at 23.00hrs.

Now thats dedication !!!
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« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2008, 10:22:37 pm »

Quote

DGShips wrote:
Glad to hear you enjoyed the trip report, it did involve a lot of driving but made a refreshing change to do all 4 ports in such a narrow period of daylight hours.

To think we used to do a 375 mile round trip all over the Humber ports in a day usually leaving at 05.30am and getting home at 23.00hrs.

Now thats dedication !!!


Hi Darren

Not just dedication but rather expensive given the cost of fuel!

I can make the Tees in about an hour and have been there a few times (South Gare) - change from the Car Carriers on the Tyne  :-o . Have thought about the Humber and further afield but I think it would have to include an overnight in a Travel Lodge.

Always interesting to read 'trip reports' only ting is we don't see enough of them.

Regards

Steve Ellwood
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Darren
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« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2008, 11:33:21 am »

Hi Steve,

Fuel is a major factor on any trip but with a bit of homework i.e www.petrolprices.com you can see where to buy the lower priced fuel, the difference between Wisbech and Yarmouth was up to 6p litre which calculated over the trip is 2-3 pounds !

The Humver used to be a fantastic place to have a day out but now we are banned from ABP property then its worthless even going there.

ABP Goole is still pretty much OK as there are public footpaths running through the port so you can still get 90% of the ships whilst on public proprty.

The Trent and Ouse are still pretty much OK although I would suggest taking a mountain bike with you for Groves Wharf & Neap House as its much quicker than walking 2 miles down the bank.

Grimsby is OK for most ships on Freshney Terminal as they can be taken from the roadway.  The ocks are a no go area.

Immingham is like fort knox, no chance of getting in, tankers on the IOT2 and 3 berths can be taken from a road that runs parallel to the riverbank, as can any ships in/out bound but they are at a distance.

Hull is also another no go place, there is a public walkway running parallel to the river where you can photograph anything on the North Gap in King George dock and anything inward/outward.

Same goes with the Alex Docks, there is a public walkway that follows the course of the River Humber and goes across the lock gates.

Same again for the Fish Docks at Hull, there is an overhead walkway which runs above some sheds resulting in ships being able to be photographed for at least 1/3rd of the dock.

Tide wise, a good place used to be off St Andrews quay where the ships used to pass within 200m of you but the swe Skitter channel has opened up and they are much more towards the North Bank now and well out of range so the Humber Bridge is the best option.  Im not sure about North Ferriby anymore as I have not been there for a while so perhaps somebody could comment on that option ??

I did hear that ships passing Paull are quite close so that could be another option although I have not been there for 15+ years !

Refer to http://www.humber.com/navigation/shipping-info.asp

This will give you ships in port, ships underway and planned voyages.

Hope this is of interest to people.
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« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2008, 02:11:21 pm »

Hi Darren

Some great hints and tips there which for someone from outside of the area would save a lot of time!

I can remember (35 years ago!) when the Fish Dock at Hull was 'Open All Areas' - I worked there then but in those days didn't have a camera or interest in them.
By chance I was talking to the Crew of the Atlantic Princess at North Shields today, they had come up from Hull to board their Trawler- all 36 of them. Due to the heavy seas the crew change was made as the Atlantic Princess travelled up the channel in the Port of Tyne - 8 at a time on the Pilot Cutter - strange sight indeed, still it avoids the berthing charge  :lol:

Regards

Steve Ellwood
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Darren
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« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2008, 06:07:23 pm »

Hi Steve,

Must have been a strange sight !

Most ports used to be fairly open but its all gone silly with Health & Safety with those ambulance chasing lawyers and influence from the claim culture we sadly live in today.

Agreed it would be good if we had sections covering all the ports, wharves and quays in the UK, that way a outsider could find their way about with ease following the expert advice from the locals.

I will do a section on the Washports a bit later and get the ball rolling hopefully everyone else will chip in and we can build a excellent reference list.

Darren
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Andrew McAlpine
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« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2008, 11:13:49 pm »

Hi Darren, i enjoyed your trip report to, and its helpfull as i plan to visit Felixstowe this year as never got round to it last year.

keep them coming! and feel free to give me a shout if your ever visiting the south coast!

rgds
Andrew    :-D
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Eddie Walker
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« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2008, 12:51:48 pm »

At the moment, ships keep well to the North all the way from Hull to Ferriby, apart from a small area between the old shipyard at Hessle and the Humber Bridge, so St Andrews Quay, the Humber Bridge and the Ferriby foreshore are all good spots for photography. Summer evenings are best for both the volume of traffic and the angle of the sun.
 
I've heard said that the channels in the Humber tend to 'flex' over time, so a penalty for the channel above the Humber Bridge coming over to the North side may be that the channel below the bridge may eventually switch to the New Holland side... time will tell.

I visited Paull recently and although the views are terrific in both directions, it's probably the worst spot on the Humber for the angle of the sun during the main part of the day.
Regards
Eddie
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Darren
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« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2008, 12:25:48 pm »

Hi Andrew,

Thanks for your comment.

Have you been to Felixstowe before then ?

Darren
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« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2008, 02:44:44 pm »

I have visited one a long time ago through work as i worked for P&O, but i want to visit again soley for some ship spotting this time!!

rgds
Andrew
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henrycourt
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« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2008, 03:09:43 pm »

Might I suggest, with respect, Felixstowe is not the best place to go for spotting and or 'photting. If you went to Felixstowe you would never be able to see all vessels that may be on the berths, in fact you could only see very few that were on the berths. I suggest instead that you go to Harwich and from there just across the river you will be able to see everything that is alongside at Felixstowe which on some occaisions could be in excess of a dozen vessels. If you take the Harwich option you will also be able to see close up the Trinity House berths and from a distance anything that might be on Parkeston Quay. I hope this helps. Rgds j.w.
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john macadie

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« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2008, 07:13:20 pm »

hi darren

i am down in devon

a tug, that i fell in love with, came up for sale and i said i'd like to buy her

the yard agreed to sell her  i asked someone to look at the engine for me

next thing i knew i had been outbid by a measley amount  too small to let me feel good about the whole thing to be honest  i think i made the mistake of saying too much to too many people in my excitement.

the new owners started her up and engine trouble developed,  the generators went and so on

so my feelings for the new owners increased

i gave up on her when she left our waters and thought  oh well goodbye lovely lady

and what do i see   your posted comments about that ship that i still love so much

st piran

any pics ? for an old fella in darkest devon

regards john macadie

www.theredwizard.com

i'm the good looking fella   obviously
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