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Author Topic: Bourbon Dolphin is sunk  (Read 10118 times)
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Jens Heri
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« on: April 15, 2007, 09:03:27 pm »

At around 20:20 GMT Bourbon Dolphin finaly sank.
At the time she was no longer attached to the oil rig.
The deept is 1100 meter
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Ben
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« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2007, 09:22:10 pm »

I havent been keeping up with this for a few days. Did they get the bodies out or anyone out alive?
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Jens Heri
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« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2007, 09:46:55 pm »

No bodies have been found since the accident.
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Mats
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« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2007, 10:01:18 pm »

This is just horrible. My thought (and the thoughts of everyone here I am sure) goes out to the families of the victims.

The Norwegian authorities will investigate the casualty with vigour, which they are known to do in such tragedies. They must get to the bottom of this so it never ever happens again.

Mats
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Bruce Sutherland
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« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2007, 10:56:00 pm »

If it was this unstable how on earth were they going to tow it to a harbour.. would have been another disaster if this sunk while being attached to a tug(s). 1.1km down could they recover this ship for investigation?

Thoughts are with all the families involved.
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Pekka Laakso
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« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2007, 12:38:02 am »

Very bad news. Both for the families and relatives of the missing crewmembers, and for the shipping company. As if the vessel could have been towed safely to the shore and turned up, she could have been repaired. Now about ½ year old vessel is lost.

Read from the news the most likely cause was the weather, it was getting stormy in the area. Also it was reported Smit decided to change the planned towing vessel and start the work until Monday instead of original plans...
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Charles McAllister
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« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2007, 03:36:27 am »

So very sad that this happened, and more sad that she sank, preventing any attempted recovery of the bodies of her crew remaining inside.

Many years ago I witnessed a harbor tug capsizing; fortunately the crew all escaped and survived.  It was a sudden and terrible event.  Apparently miscommunication led to the ship getting underway while the tug was still connected.  There was a lot of slack in the line, it led straight aft and over the tug's stern.  In an instant it came taut and snapped around to the port side, pulling the tug over. It happened in a matter of seconds.  A crewman on the ship reacted quickly and cut the line with an ax.  Not soon enough to prevent the capsizing, but fast enough to prevent the overturned hull from being dragged along, which might have killed the crewmen who were in the water.

I mention this because I saw how quickly things can go badly in the midst of normal operations.  It would seem that the anchor line somehow came to be led over the side rather than over the stern, perhaps she dropped and turned suddenly from wave action.  that would appear to be the only way to lose stability so quickly, but this is only speculation.

Prayers for those who did not survive and for their families.  Now we just hope that the cause can be learned, so this tragedy will never occur again.
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Charles
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« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2007, 04:17:59 pm »

Quote

Vox wrote:
At around 18:30 GMT Bourbon Dolphin finaly sank.
At the time she was no longer attached to the platform.
The deept is 1100 meter  


Hi Vox

This piece freom the BBC web site @
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/north_east/6558439.stm

"Capsized rig support vessel sinks  
 
Seven of the 15 crew members survived the tragedy
The oil rig support ship which capsized off Shetland, killing eight of the crew, may not be raised after it sank.
The Bourbon Dolphin overturned in the Atlantic on Thursday and coastguards said it sank at 2115 BST on Sunday.

Among those who lost their lives in the tragedy was a 14-year-old boy who was on work experience.

On Sunday, relatives of the dead crew members had gathered at a beach in Lerwick for a memorial service before flying over the upturned ship.

Three bodies have so far been recovered and five others are missing, presumed dead. It is thought their bodies may still be inside the boat.

 
Mr Hafsas said he could not feel happy about being rescued


Survivor's story  
The ship's operator, Bourbon Offshore, had hoped to tow the vessel back to shore.

Describing the ship as "very unstable", Shetland Coastguard watch manager Neil Cumming said: "It was released from a rig yesterday and slowly it began to sink."

It is now thought unlikely the Bourbon Dolphin will be raised from the seabed, about 3,500ft down.

Survivors of the capsize joined relatives of the victims on the Sands of Sound beach where a service was conducted in Norwegian.

Report findings

One crew member, Egil Hafsas, described what happened when the boat overturned.

He said he was on deck when the ship lurched and started to list.

He ran into the accommodation part of the main deck, grabbed a life vest and shouted for everyone to leave.

Then he jumped into the water along with two young trainees just before the ship rolled over into the sea.

Bourbon Offshore released the names of the dead and missing crew members, who included 14-year-old David Remøy and his father Oddne Arve Remøy, 44, the ship's captain.

The others are Ronny Emblem, 25, Bjarte Grimstad, 37, Søren Kroer, 27, Frank Nygård, 42, Kjetil Rune Våge, 31, and Tor Karl Sandø, 54.

The police investigation has been handed over to a Norwegian government commission set up to look into the incident.

The Norwegian Marine Commission inquiry could report findings as early as the beginning of next week."

Regards

Steve Ellwood
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Cedric Hacke
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« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2007, 04:44:46 pm »

Hi,

are there more details about the events that led to the accident?

I feel very sorry for the loss of lives.
All my prayers will go to them and their families.

Regards
Cedric
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Tomas Østberg- Jacobsen
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« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2007, 06:03:56 pm »

Fred over deres minne. Ah, this is sad. The fourteen-year old boy that traveled with his father is one of the missing that presumably went down with her.

Rest in peace, guys....


Tomas sandefjord Norway
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Daniel Marquinhos
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« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2007, 09:18:53 pm »

The Dutch salvage contactors Smit Salvage have this morning started the salvage operation of the capsized anchor handling supply tug \'Bourbon Dolphin\'.


The salvage operation plan is to recover the chain between the 'Transocean Rather' rig and the 'Bourbon Dolphin'. The 'Olympic Hercules' and the 'Vider Vicking' remain on scene to assist in the recovery of the chain; the 'Highland Valour' is also expected to be on scene later tonight to support the operation.

Eventually Smit Salvage hope to be able to tow the 'Boubon Dolphin' back to Shetland

Regards
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mooringman
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« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2007, 01:21:35 am »

i wonder,if they ever will find out the reason for the capsizing of the vessel,which is now deep at the sea bottom.
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« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2007, 07:29:09 am »

Hi,

Please forgive my ignorance but when SMIT say they are going to eventually tow Bourbon Dolphin back to Shetland, how on earth are they to accomplish that feat Huh If it is about a kilometer down surely that would prohibit recovery of the Bourbon Dolphin ?

Regards

Richy.
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Ron
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« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2007, 09:43:26 am »

richyD ,the salvage plan you refer to was drawn up to deal with the situation at the time, a capsized but floating vessel. Following the sinking, the situation has changed completely, so fresh decisions will have to be made.
According to the Bourbon website most of the Smit team had left the site before midday on the 16th April.
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« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2007, 12:19:14 pm »

Quote

Sandy wrote:
richyD ,the salvage plan you refer to was drawn up to deal with the situation at the time, a capsized but floating vessel. Following the sinking, the situation has changed completely, so fresh decisions will have to be made.
According to the Bourbon website most of the Smit team had left the site before midday on the 16th April.


Hi Sandy

Chances are that the vessel will never be recovered - sad but true.

Regards

Steve Ellwood
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