ShipSpotting.com
Login: Lost Password? SIGN UP
Ship Photo Search
Advanced Search
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: 2020 is the year of death for many vessels  (Read 2121 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Angelgreat
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 319


View Profile
« on: January 16, 2021, 05:10:16 pm »

It's 2021 and its time to reflect over 2020. Due to the pandemic, more vessels have been sold for scrap than any other year. It's affecting every cruise line, so selling vessels is the only way to make profit during these tough times. While some vessels got new owners, most are going to Alang, India or Aliaga, Turkey. The youngest vessel to be sold for scrap is the 1996-built Costa Victoria at only 25 years while the oldest to be scrapped is the 1961-built Marco Polo which at 60 years was the second oldest oceal liner turned cruise ship and the last surviving Soviet vessel.

It's not just some historic ships, even sister ships are being scrapped together! The eldest two Sovereign-class vessels the Sovereign and Monarch are being scrapped next to each other in Aliaga while their third sister Majesty is being scrapped in Alang. The first surviving purpose-built Carnival Cruise Line vessels also been sold for scrap. The Ocean Dream (ex. Tropicale), which was Carnival Cruises Line's first newly built ship is to be scrapped in Alang alongside the two remaining Holiday-class vessels and her younger ex-fleetmates the Magellan (ex. Holiday) and Grand Celebration (ex. Celebration) (the third sister Henna (ex. Jubilee) was scrapped in Alang in 2017). They are to be scrapped next to the two Crown-class Karnika (ex. Crown Princess) and Satoshi (ex. Regal Princess) which were the third and fourth purpose built vessels respectivelt for Princess Cruises. Even three of the eight Fantasy-class vessels Carnival Fantasy, Carnival Imagination, and Carnival Inspiration are being scrapped together in Aliaga.

It's tough to see vessels go, but when the pandemic crashes the cruising industry, reducing fleet is the only way to try to save the company. As newer vessels are better, larger and modern, older and vessels will be retired to make room. With 2021 still bearing the scars of 2020, only time will tell which more vessels will be saved or not.
Report to moderator   Logged
Bob Scott
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 217



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2021, 07:32:46 pm »

I find myself more saddened by the 2 million-plus people who have died due to Covid-19 than by the demise of a few superannuated cruise ships which are, after all, just big machines and lumps of metal, plastic and wood.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2021, 10:54:10 pm by Bob Scott » Report to moderator   Logged
Bob Scott
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 217



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2021, 11:09:58 pm »

As a now-seasoned cruiser (10 since 2012), 2021 will NOT be a better year. The smaller cruise ships that I have enjoyed have mostly gone and most of those that are left I cannot afford. No way do I want to go on those 3,000-to-6,000-passenger floating gin palaces. Especially after having seen my favourite cruise line's inflated prices, and the implications of Brexit, I think it's time now to explore my own country.
Report to moderator   Logged
Tuomas Romu
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 342


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2021, 09:16:22 am »

What's the impact of fluctuating scrap price on the recycling of passenger ships which, compared tankers and container ships, must be more labor intensive to break and include a lot of non-valuable materials as well? The scrap prices has been increasing steadily, but there was a sudden drop in $/ldt scrap prices last week.

https://www.tradewindsnews.com/shipbroking/scrap-prices-fall-sharply-as-negotiations-grind-to-a-halt/2-1-948395
Report to moderator   Logged
sunday sailor
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 2


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2021, 10:22:42 am »

A large fleet of new cruise ships is being introduced in 2020 and 2021, according to industry sources it adds to 46 new cruise vessels.

With that number of new ships being introduced, the number of scrappings is still relatively low. One would think that even without the pandemic there is a need to dispose old tonnage.
Report to moderator   Logged
sunday sailor
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 2


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2021, 03:20:45 pm »

I wonder what is the future of MS Funchal. It would be nice, if that vessel could stay for an active future career.
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Page created in 0.023 seconds with 19 queries.
Copyright © 2010 All rights reserved