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Author Topic: New To This - Marine Traffic Management & Accuracy  (Read 4714 times)
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RedSchuhart
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« on: December 08, 2019, 11:58:24 am »

In June this year we bought a house that looks over the River Ouse in East Yorkshire, about a mile or so from Goole. We have a balcony outside the bedroom which enables us to get a clear and close up view of ships passing to and from the port.
We've become hooked on ship spotting now. But there are a couple of things that we can't find answers to online.
First, when we look at the AIS map on say Vesselfinder, there is an area outside the mouth of the Humber where there are always a few ships more or less stationary. Is this like a waiting area linked to traffic management? If so how do you get a general guide to how they manage marine traffic?
Second, the accuracy of expected ships seems to have gone haywire in the last few weeks. We accept that delays and changes to schedules will be inevitable. Is this normal?
Third, apart from paying an absurd amount of money is there a way to get info on what cargo's ships are carrying?
If anyone can point us to websites, books etc that will enable us to understand marine traffic better it would be appreciated.
Hope this all makes sense and hopefully someone will be able to help us.
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Patrick Hill
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« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2019, 12:32:07 pm »

Hi,

The Humber anchorages are just off Spurn point, the main deep water (for larger vessels) is the furthest offshore to the North east. There are also two sheltered anchorages in the Humber entrance too.

ABP has a shipping movements page - http://www.humber.com/Live_Information/Shipping_Movements/ - updated every hour.

I use MarineTraffic for AIS, it is free and is relatively accurate, although in the last few months upriver of Hull has been degraded.

As for cargo, this may be more difficult to find out.

Best regards

Patrick
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Ian Thomas
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« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2019, 05:16:53 pm »

Try this http://www.shipais.co.uk/ and it is free.


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Ian Thomas
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urknn
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« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2019, 04:02:54 pm »

I found a YouTube video that describes how AIS marine traffic works. Cheesy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRtBr-2Oqz0

I hope it helps you.
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coasterwatcher
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« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2019, 10:57:32 pm »

Coastal Shipping magazine includes cargo details of all ships calling at one of the ports on the Ouse. The magazine is published bi-monthly.
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RedSchuhart
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« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2019, 06:39:28 am »

Thanks for the info Patrick we'll Have a look the ABP site

Hi,

The Humber anchorages are just off Spurn point, the main deep water (for larger vessels) is the furthest offshore to the North east. There are also two sheltered anchorages in the Humber entrance too.

ABP has a shipping movements page - http://www.humber.com/Live_Information/Shipping_Movements/ - updated every hour.

I use MarineTraffic for AIS, it is free and is relatively accurate, although in the last few months upriver of Hull has been degraded.

As for cargo, this may be more difficult to find out.

Best regards

Patrick
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RedSchuhart
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« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2019, 06:40:33 am »

Thanks Ian we'll have a look at that

Try this http://www.shipais.co.uk/ and it is free.


Regards
Ian Thomas
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RedSchuhart
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« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2019, 06:41:28 am »

That sounds interesting. we'll have a look

Coastal Shipping magazine includes cargo details of all ships calling at one of the ports on the Ouse. The magazine is published bi-monthly.
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victor radio74
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« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2019, 10:56:05 pm »

An interesting AIS source is also LocalizaTodoHTML5
rgds
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RedSchuhart
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« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2019, 02:34:37 pm »

That's really interesting. Shows aircraft as well. Thanks

An interesting AIS source is also LocalizaTodoHTML5
rgds

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Eddie Walker
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« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2019, 03:24:03 pm »

Hello, and welcome to the area! As has been mentioned, Marine Traffic seems to have lost coverage of the upper Humber, so I am currently using two other apps - Ship Tracking, because it has a better voyage history (but still suffers the same problems with live positions), and Vessel Finder - which is poor in other ways but still shows accurate positions for ships within the Goole dock system. If you compare this with the movement logs on the ABP website, you will soon get to know where each of the berths in the docks are. Couple this with the origin or destination of the ship and you will soon have a good idea of the cargoes.
Firstly exports: the two main ones being scrap metal from West Dock North - either to Spain and Portugal, or higher graded aluminium scrap to Tornio in Finland. These ships usually stop at Blacktoft Jetty on the outward voyage because it is rarely possible to make the passage in one go on account of their deep draft. The other regular export is used caravans to Poland and Lithuania, loaded at West Dock South - these ships are obvious by their deck cargo.
Turning to imports - bricks are brought from Bornem (also called Wintham) to Aldam Dock East. The 4 shed covered steel terminal deals with, you've guessed it, steel from the Rhine, Dunkirk and also paper reels, which are currently mainly loaded in Gdynia. The gantry crane in Ship Dock is used to discharge timber cargoes from Arkhangel'sk and also steel cargoes - ships from  Pasajes will normally be carrying steel sections. Another form of steel - wire rod in coils - is normally brought from Szczecin to West Dock North East Corner. Cement cargoes usually come from Aalborg and are obvious because of the specialist bulk cargo ships used. Once or twice a month, a coastal tanker appears, often bringing a part cargo of edible oils to the Kerfoot facility on Barge Dock (the berth known as Carrs Corner), having first called at Hull. Ships from Frederiksvaerk discharge steel at West Dock South East berth. Ships from Malaga or Motril are usually bringing limestone or marble chips. Other bulk cargoes handled are chemicals from Kokkola at Ouse Dock and agribulks from Eastern Europe at Caldaire Terminal, South Dock Terminal or West Dock south. Various grades of chipboard and fibreboard are brought, currently from Riga, Szczecin or Swinoujscie to these same berths.
Ships heading for the wharves at Howdendyke call at Blacktoft Jetty to change pilots and are normally loaded with so-called 'intermediates' for the fertilizer plant or cement for the former Daltrade storage facility if coming from Limerick.
As you will have no doubt found, it is easy to observe the activity in Goole from the A161 (Bridge Street) and from a public footpath which runs from the end of South Street, across the inner gates of Ocean Lock and across the Lowther Bridge, which straddles the channel betwwen Victoria Lock and the rest of the dock system.

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RedSchuhart
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« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2019, 09:03:48 am »

Eddie, brilliant. Just what we needed. You've even solved the Blacktoft mystery, as we couldn't understand why some moored there.
So Marine Traffic is better in many ways compared to Vessel Finder? We've been using the latter because their tracking no longer shows any traffic in our area. May I ask in what way is it poor compared to Marine Traffic? Also we've noticed that Vessel Finder's tracking starts to lag once vessels get past Blacktoft.
Is all this, Marine Traffic included, down to poor coverage in this area or is there a 'technical hitch' somewhere? As we understand it these sites rely on locally based AIS stations(?)
Sorry about all the questions but as my original query said we're complete novices at this but find it fascinating.
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Eddie Walker
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« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2019, 03:20:24 pm »

Happy to help!
The drawbacks with Vessel Finder I find are that it doesn't show any kind of voyage history, only (at best) next port. Also, as far as I am aware, you can't search by port and get a list of vessels in port, ships expected etc.
The problems with Marine Traffic coverage are, I think, down to individuals with the receiving equipment not sharing their data with the website, although it would seem today that coverage of Goole and the Trent has been restored. Happy days!
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solentships
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« Reply #13 on: December 19, 2019, 03:30:05 pm »

I think Vesselfinder is much better than Marinetraffic for port calls. Vesselfinder gives information about the last 5 port calls whenever they were for free, while MT only gives port calls back 2 days for free.

VF doesn't list vessels currently in port but it does show the last 20 arrivals, last 20 departures and up to 20 expected arrivals.

 
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