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Author Topic: Pierre Raddison on Lake Ontario, Griffon still on Erie, what is going on?  (Read 2682 times)
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Paul Bradshaw
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« on: March 24, 2019, 10:08:36 pm »

 Huh
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Tristin Woolf
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« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2019, 04:00:03 pm »

I believe that both vessels are there in support of transits through Erie and Ontario. Most coast guard vessels are in the upper lakes currently assisting as the season gets underway.
USCG Hollyhock, USCG Katmai Bay, USCG Biscayne Bay are all assisting in thick ice near Mackinac Island.
USCG Neah Bay is assisting in the St. Mary’s River near the Soo.
USCG Mackinaw is near Whitefish Bay to assist in that heavy ice, while USCG Alder assists in Duluth and CCG Samuel Risley assists in Thunder Bay.

Since most of the attention is on the upper lakes with the heavy ice that is up there, I don’t think its far-fetched to assume that CCG has brought Pierre Radisson and Griffon to assist in the lower lakes as backup. Martha L. Black was also headed for the lakes but it appears she has headed back for Montreal, assuming she is not needed.
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« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2019, 10:12:36 pm »

Griffon works Erie all winter normally. There must be extensive pack ice this year? No word in the media yet?
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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2019, 08:24:09 pm »

DAILY GREAT LAKES and
SEAWAY SHIPPING NEWS

Severe ice conditions off Port Colborne keep ships in Welland Canal
3/27 - Port Colborne , ON – As two Canadian Coast Guard icebreakers work to clear severe ice off of Port Colborne, at least a dozen vessels are being held up in the Welland Canal and just offshore. The delay is proving costly for ship owners, said Gregg Ruhl, president and chief executive officer of St. Catharines-based Algoma Central Corp.
"We have seven ships in the canal waiting to go that direction," Ruhl said Tuesday.
The direction he's referring to is upbound — vessels headed from Lake Ontario to Lake Erie. "It's very costly … we have seven ships and for every day we lose, we lose a round-trip voyage."
Algoma and competitor Canada Steamship Lines (CSL) are constantly moving through the canal with cargoes to and from ports across the Great Lakes. Right now, it's only Canadian vessels being held up. Ocean-going vessels have yet to make their way to the canal.
Ruhl said in addition to the financial cost to Algoma, the delay creates a reduction in capacity for the 2019 season. "We're booked full every day and we can't make that back up," he said.
An email from the Canadian Coast Guard said its icebreakers CCGS Griffon and CCGS Pierre Radisson are encountering ice ridges between 2.5 and three metres high off of Port Colborne. The Griffon had been working to clear offshore of the city when the canal opened last Friday and had been joined by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Bristol Bay.
Canada and the U.S. share icebreaking duties on the Great Lakes, with vessels working wherever needed on either side of the border.
The Coast Guard said to break the ice in the shipping lanes and mouth of the Welland Canal, the icebreakers move forward, stop, back up and then power forward.
The federal agency said the icebreakers will continue to break tracks until conditions are safe to perform escorts through the ice and that the Griffon will stay in the area until conditions improve and the ice can be safely handled by one icebreaker.
"The Coast Guard continues to maintain regular communication with industry and local stakeholders in order to prioritize work," it said in the email.
Ruhl was betting the Algoma vessels on the Welland Canal would start moving through the ice Wednesday.
Welland Tribune
Read more and view a photo gallery at this link: https://www.wellandtribune.ca/news-story/9241352-severe-ice-conditions-off-port-colborne-keep-ships-in-welland-canal/

http://www.boatnerd.com/
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« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2019, 12:24:49 am »

Since this news posting came out, it appears that Griffon and Pierre Radisson were able to get things freed up enough to resume traffic, an most vessels seem to be on their way. Both Pierre Radisson and Griffon are currently sitting S/SE of Port Colborne, while Martha L Black is anchored in the seaway just south of Ogdensburg, probably as a “just in case.”

Thank you for sharing that article! I was also noticing yesterday the unusual amount of vessels lined up in Port Colborne..
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« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2019, 05:28:20 pm »

Griffon now sits at the north end of Lake Ontario, and the Martha L. Black is transiting the Welland Canal as we speak, nearly to Port Colborne. I would assume that Martha L. Black will take the place of Pierre Radisson who’s assistance is needed in Georgian Bay of Lake Huron to help laker Baie Comeau out of Midland, were she is stuck in layup due to heavy ice.

More about that issue at this article: https://kitchener.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=1647865
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« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2019, 02:13:34 pm »

It continues to be an unusual year with Martha Black and Griffon continuing to work the east end of the lake at the entrance to the St Lawrence River. I crossed on the ferry to Amherst Island Wednesday and it seemed normal.
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« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2019, 03:04:28 am »

Pierre Raddison still on Erie, now joined by Amundsen and it appears that Griffon is on its way back. Must be trouble? I once read a lake bottom survey report which found that the ice can be forced to the bottom when large ridges form, and create gouging in the lake bottom.
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« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2019, 09:25:14 pm »

Des Groseilliers now on Lake Ontario. What a year!
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« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2019, 09:33:29 pm »

https://www.simcoe.com/news-story/9274493-coast-guard-s-latest-icebreaking-trip-to-midland-unsuccessful/
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« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2019, 10:38:10 pm »

Was away for a while traveling, but am back now and have seen all the unusual ice breaker activity! The past couple weeks have been very interesting;
CCG Samuel Risley went down with engine troubles, keeping her docked in Thunder Bay. This forced USCG Alder to spend a bit of time in Thunder Bay until Canadian reinforcements arrived. Those reinforcements included CCG Griffon and Pierre Radisson. (Unsure of exactly when and what order they arrived in.)
Within those couple weeks, several attempts were made by both US and Canadian coast guard to break out heavy ice in Georgian Bay to free a Canadian freighter that is trapped in Midland. The Pierre Radisson was the primary vessel to attempt to break through, which she attempted two times, unsuccessfully, before heading up towards Thunder Bay.
All of this movement caused CCG Amundsen and Des Groseilliers to take over in the lower lakes, and we even saw Martha L. Black here for a short period of time. Amundsen has since returned to Quebec and Des Groseilliers is still south of the Welland Canal.

Yesterday, the Pierre Radisson made a third attempt to break through Georgian Bay, which appears to have been unsuccessful.
As of today, the Samuel Risley appears to be back up and running, and joins Griffon in Thunder Bay operations. The rest of the focus has been placed on Whitefish Bay, north of the Soo, where USCG Mackinaw has been tirelessly assisting vessels for weeks. Among other vessels to assist in that area over the past two weeks include USCG Hollyhock, Biscayne Bay, and Katmai Bay.

It has been very interesting to watch, especially with all the unusual visits by CCG vessels. The most interesting to follow is the ongoing struggle to get the freighter BAIE COMEAU (IMO 9639892) out of the ice trap in Midland.
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« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2019, 03:28:23 pm »

Slight correction to yesterday’s post: The Pierre Radisson did in fact reach Midland successfully, and both ice breaker and freighter are finally on the move out through Georgian Bay! I suppose that the hardest work to break ice is now behind us, and ice breaking activity should start to calm down, especially with Samuel Risley up and running again. Another hint of this is that USCG Mackinaw has headed back to her home port.
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