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Author Topic: Netherlands tug detained in Spain  (Read 2426 times)
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davidships
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« on: April 21, 2018, 08:37:59 am »

The Spanish port state control inspectors are renowned for "always finding something", and it was careless of the Dutch tug EDDY I (IMO 9714575) both to run low on fuel coming back from Venezuela - and then to enter Vigo without flying the Spanish courtesy ensign.  

However it is rather embarrasing that a three-year-old EU-flagged vessel should have been detained for nearly a month.  She had only just reverted to NLD flag in March, so the subsequent change to Panama while she is detained looks more like a move to keep the NLD record as low as possible.

http://www.farodevigo.es/portada-ourense/2018/03/22/capitania-inmoviliza-remolcador-holandes-fallos/1859023.html#
https://www.parismou.org/detentions-banning/current-detentions
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« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2018, 08:10:28 pm »

Not sure if it is really like that,,but heard that the spanish government does not have anything in their budget for PSC and the PSC people have to finance their salaries through fines imposed on vessels calling spanish ports. That could be a reason for their bad names.
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NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
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« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2018, 11:38:40 am »

Its just the same for trucks in Spain. For what would be a 100 fine or less in the UK is often more than 3000 in Spain and that could be for something as pathetically small as going 5 minutes over driving time for whatever reason. This is the reason why you see foreign trucks parked all over the place where they're not supposed to in England because the drivers are petrified of getting fined in places like Spain later for "offences" committed elsewhere.
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Federico
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2018, 03:24:54 pm »

Not sure if it is really like that,,but heard that the spanish government does not have anything in their budget for PSC and the PSC people have to finance their salaries through fines imposed on vessels calling spanish ports. That could be a reason for their bad names.

Personally me and my Companies ships never had problems with PSC in Spain. I don't think that in Spain there are low budget for PSC or in general for safety of the navigation and of the lifes at sea. You can imagine that they send warships and planes in East Med to contribute with various SAR operations and assistance on behalf of "migrants" coming from Africa to Italy and Greece or Turkey...you can figure out how much can be a problem the salary of "50 persons" that probably work already for the Maritime Administration...

Anyway...the remarks and deficiencies are related also to the quantity of provisions (!), the expired insurance for civil liability and basic firefighting equipment out of order...something that is not easy to justify...!
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« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2018, 09:51:37 pm »

Well Frederico,, SAR and such do not have much to do with Port State Control issues.
I was not in spanish ports for a whole while but according conversations between me and two others Masters of our fleet who were in Spain, the main tenor was, that they search until they find something. Of course one can say that the way it has to be, but running a ship is 10000 things to think of and the regulations are changing
quicker then they can be announced in these days were ships switching from standard navigation to paperless navigation systems for all ships withhin the next 2 years. I do not say that they should go too easy on ships, but personally I had a problem on a ship, where life rings were stored inside in order that they are not stolen in ports, and the PSC in that port wanted to make out of that a major deficiency.
A in port inside stored embarkation ladder for the forward life raft was also listed at that time as a major defie !!!   I know personally from another ship that a stolen cap (copper) of the fireline was also written down as major defie. It looks sometimes the PSC think, they have to find and write down something as they are otherwise not doing a good job. But I agree fully with you a good PSC system should exist world wide.
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« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2018, 10:12:06 pm »

They must write something...
I remember in 2012 I was oboard a cruise ship visited by USCG in Italy before crossing the Atlantic for repositioning in the Caribbean and departing from a US port. They were writing every unsignificant problem, on their mind. At the end of the 3 days inspections there were something like 120 deficiencies.
Then we went to the restaurant...also with ship superintendent and drydock representatives. The day after the deficiencies not serious were canceled and the real ones were 6 or 7. Tutto il mondo paese...!  Grin
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