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Author Topic: Cargo 'Betanzos' aground while leaving Lisbon harbour  (Read 4821 times)
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Ricardo Bruno
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« Reply #15 on: March 16, 2018, 08:27:24 am »

According to some media in Portugal, Betanzos is already free and is being towed to Lisbon harbour.
For example: http://expresso.sapo.pt/sociedade/2018-03-16-Tejo.-Navio-que-estava-encalhado-em-Lisboa-ja-flutua#gs.vlp6FTc
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victor radio74
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« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2018, 09:14:01 am »

That is right,it can be seen on real time at Localizatodo.com. Thanks to the portuguese fellow members for these reports
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jdap
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« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2018, 02:41:28 pm »

Correct!

The last attempt was a successful one!

The big tug started the pull at high tide by around 1:00am on Friday night, 16/3, and by 2:30am the 'Betanzos' was floating again (at last!).

The salvaged vessel was then towed in the morning hours by several harbour tugs of the Rebonave fleet to the same Beato Multipurpose Terminal (TMB) that she had left in the night of the 6th only to find herself grounded at the big sand bank by the Tagus river South entrance an hour later, to the E of the Bugio lighthouse.

At Beato, she moored safely, and is being unloaded there before she enters dry dock for a thorough inspection.

She shows a 15-18 degree inclination to the port side, which was the one most exposed to the high waves during the 10 days she was stuck in the sand. The reason for that inclination is undetermined. It could be due to a cargo shift, or to structural damage due to the waves, or to the abnormal pulling efforts she endured during the period she was grounded. Some damage appears to exist also on the superstructure, on the same side. Damage may also include the small tender boat pictured on the 4th, by then still positioned correctly at level, and that now is hanging vertically and pointing to the water. The outboard engine of the tender boat appears to be missing.

All things considered, a success story, and a happy end!

Congratulations to the Fairmount experts, including the crew of the Fairmount Alpine high seas tug (IMO 9344784), that made this salvage possible!
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davidships
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« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2018, 11:11:49 pm »

Thanks for keeping us all in the picture, Josť.
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jdap
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« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2018, 09:29:47 pm »

My pleasure, David.

That's what I think we're all here for, I guess...

Best regards,

Jose
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pspott
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« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2018, 01:40:12 pm »

Correct!

The last attempt was a successful one!

The big tug started the pull at high tide by around 1:00am on Friday night, 16/3, and by 2:30am the 'Betanzos' was floating again (at last!).

The salvaged vessel was then towed in the morning hours by several harbour tugs of the Rebonave fleet to the same Beato Multipurpose Terminal (TMB) that she had left in the night of the 6th only to find herself grounded at the big sand bank by the Tagus river South entrance an hour later, to the E of the Bugio lighthouse.

At Beato, she moored safely, and is being unloaded there before she enters dry dock for a thorough inspection.

She shows a 15-18 degree inclination to the port side, which was the one most exposed to the high waves during the 10 days she was stuck in the sand. The reason for that inclination is undetermined. It could be due to a cargo shift, or to structural damage due to the waves, or to the abnormal pulling efforts she endured during the period she was grounded. Some damage appears to exist also on the superstructure, on the same side. Damage may also include the small tender boat pictured on the 4th, by then still positioned correctly at level, and that now is hanging vertically and pointing to the water. The outboard engine of the tender boat appears to be missing.

All things considered, a success story, and a happy end!

Congratulations to the Fairmount experts, including the crew of the Fairmount Alpine high seas tug (IMO 9344784), that made this salvage possible!
it's great Grin Grin Roll Eyes
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