ShipSpotting.com
Login: Lost Password? SIGN UP
Ship Photo Search
Advanced Search
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: Harbour pilots - method of boarding.  (Read 10427 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
MattB
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 153


It's me and you may find me annoying.


View Profile
« on: September 28, 2015, 04:44:02 pm »

Hello there,

I was wondering what the preferred method of boarding a vessel is for pilots, personally or in general?
I'm guessing that for Captains of vessels, any method would be advantageous just as long as the pilot managed to get aboard !

But have there been any instances/incidents where anyone has lost their footing & taken a tumble into the briny?
There must be some scary stories out there to be shared.

Kind regards,

Report to moderator   Logged
Paul Finnigan
Photo Administrator
Just can't stay away
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 71


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2015, 10:00:24 pm »

Hi Mattyboy,

There are a few videos on YouTube of pilots boarding which may answer some of your question.

Cheers. 
Report to moderator   Logged
Captain Ted
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8,983



View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2015, 10:07:52 pm »

Well Mattyboy

now and then it goes the wrong way,, in Houston a pilot died loosing his footing and fall into the water some years back. Not sure I think the same happened at SW pass the entrance into the Mississippi River. I am sure it happens all over the world. After all , stepping from a small pilot boat onto a ladder which moves with the vessel which has it down the side of the hull is a dangerous job.
Just look at Chris Howels pictures he takes now and then out there !!!!

brgds
capt ted
Report to moderator   Logged

NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
WadeArmstrong
Capt Wade Armstrong
Photo Corrections
Just popping in
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


Pearl Harbor Pilot


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2015, 06:18:59 am »

As a pilot, I prefer:
1.  a low side-port over a high deck.
2.  A fixed installed ladder (sometimes on the stern) over a portable pilot ladder.
3.  A sturdy ladder over a flimsy ladder (I have destroyed a couple of sub-standard pilot ladders).
4.  A ladder that lays flush against the hull over a ladder that hangs away from the hull in mid-air.
5.  Boarding in sheltered water over boarding in rough seas.
6.  For large ships, an elevator instead of eight levels of stairs.
7.  Because the threat of going in the water is always present, warm tropical water with minimal currents over frigid northern waters with strong currents.
Report to moderator   Logged
Clyde Dickens
FAQ Administrator
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,507



View Profile
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2015, 08:29:50 am »

Thank you Wade for the summary.  I think you must be brave as well as fit.
Report to moderator   Logged

To view some of the shipspotting sites I use, see the listing at  http://www.shipspotting.com/modules/myalbum/photo.php?lid=510326.
Captain Ted
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8,983



View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2015, 01:12:26 pm »

@ Wade,, you forgot with "fresh brewed coffee on the bridge instead of instant " !!  :-))

btw,,where you are as pilot ?

brgds
capt ted
Report to moderator   Logged

NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
Glenn Towler
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,196



View Profile
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2015, 10:38:25 am »

There was a car carrier that used to visit Hobart where the pilot hopped off the pilot launch into a man cage that was lowered by a crew member in it to the deck level of the pilot launch before being
lifted 15 decks.  Where he then had a short walk up to the bridge only have to climb 1 set of stairs.


Report to moderator   Logged

...
MattB
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 153


It's me and you may find me annoying.


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2015, 11:07:37 am »

Thank you for those detailed insights.

@Wade So that vessel in the photo has a dedicated pilot boarding ladder? I'm imagining how difficult it would be to board in a heavy sea.

I've learn't something from your list. I was unaware that cargo vessels had elevators. I thought it was just cruise-ships that enjoyed the exclusivity of elevators.

@Paul & @CaptTed Those videos are amazing. That pilot boarding FORMOSABULK BRAVE whilst in ballast - RESPECT to him for climbing that rope ladder with no safety gear. I wondered if it is good practice for receiving ship skippers to keep a watch out on the bridge. There didn't appear to be anyone keeping a look out on the bridge wing whilst the pilot boarded.
Maybe if some kind of netting could be rigged at the base of the ladder but also allows the pilot to climb up through it could be devised.

You certainly look like you have to fit to do that kind of job. Legs like Superman !!


Report to moderator   Logged
Captain Ted
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8,983



View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2015, 01:43:36 pm »

@MattyBoy,,, as per Wade,,those ships are boarded via tug boat from the stern not via pilot boat.

Nets would be more hinderance then help!!
I am pretty sure that there was someone watching, one of the things I always do, being outside on the
out wing and watch the pilot boarding. Of course possibly nowadays as not "not needed" anymore, just push a button. Also possible that the ship has cameras in the wing so that one can follow the action from inside.
Report to moderator   Logged

NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
WadeArmstrong
Capt Wade Armstrong
Photo Corrections
Just popping in
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


Pearl Harbor Pilot


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: October 11, 2015, 05:59:07 pm »

Here is a shot of a pilot boarding via a good pilot ladder on a clean hull in good weather, many of the risks mitigated, but still quite a climb.
Report to moderator   Logged
MattB
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 153


It's me and you may find me annoying.


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2015, 08:17:25 pm »

Hmmm, interesting picture. So essential equipment needed for a sturdy climb include (but not limited to), a rugged pair of boots & gloves !
Report to moderator   Logged
Malim Sahib
Just can't stay away
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 139

Merchant Seaman.


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2015, 09:32:16 pm »

There are different schools of thought on gloves, some prefer not to use them as in their opinion they can get a better grip without them.
Report to moderator   Logged
WadeArmstrong
Capt Wade Armstrong
Photo Corrections
Just popping in
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


Pearl Harbor Pilot


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: October 11, 2015, 10:04:37 pm »

Agreed on the gloves.  I only wear them where I expect a really dirty ladder (on semi-submersibles fouled with seaweed or barnacles).
Report to moderator   Logged
MattB
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 153


It's me and you may find me annoying.


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2015, 10:32:05 am »

@Wade Have you ever boarded a submarine? Firstly, I always thought that the military were a fairly suspicious bunch & wouldn't allow pilots on board. Secondly, due to the curvature of the hull, I'm guessing there's no easy way except for a long-jump to gain a foothold.
Report to moderator   Logged
Jim McQuarrie
Quite a regular
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 60


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: October 12, 2015, 10:38:01 am »

Think There are rungs on side for climbing up
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Page created in 0.058 seconds with 20 queries.
Copyright © 2010 All rights reserved