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Author Topic: Passenger killled on cruise ship Marco Polo by freak wave.  (Read 17487 times)
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Alan Green
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« on: February 15, 2014, 08:45:55 am »

Regretfully a passenger has been killed on the cruise ship Marco Polo by a freak wave crashing through a window whilst the vessel was transiting the English Channel on route to Tilbury.

Courtesy MSN:

An 85-year-old man died yesterday after the 22,000-tonne Marco Polo cruise ship was hit by a freak wave in the English Channel.

Water crashed through a window, injuring a number of people. The man was airlifted off the vessel along with a woman in her 70s, but later died. A number of other passengers received minor injuries and were treated on board.
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Pier Master
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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2014, 11:55:50 am »

The BBC news report...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-26194897
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Blistering barnacles...
SteKrueBe
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« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2014, 12:02:24 pm »

A freak wave in the relatively shallow English channel would be a sensational phenomenon. I doubt it.
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Phil English
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« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2014, 12:33:01 pm »

A freak wave in the relatively shallow English channel would be a sensational phenomenon. I doubt it.

Freak waves have been battering the SW coast of Britain for the past week. Google it!

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Phil
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SteKrueBe
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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2014, 01:17:03 pm »

I did. You mean the numerous reports in which eight meter waves are mistakenly referred to as "freak waves" or "monster waves"? I don't want to start quarrel about it, but heavy storms and monster waves are not the same.
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Phil English
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« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2014, 01:29:05 pm »

Freak = abnormal.

The waves experienced recently along Channel coasts were up to 75 ft high. That's abnormal, therefore freak.


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Phil



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Tuomas Romu
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« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2014, 02:27:25 pm »

On the other hand, "freak wave" is an often-used term for a rogue wave:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freak_wave
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SteKrueBe
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« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2014, 03:00:39 pm »

That's basically what I meant, Tuomas. Freak- monster- or rogue waves (whatever you will call them) are very rare phenomena and their occurence cannot be predicted, but an area with severe weather can (and you will do everything to avoid it). That's why i have my doubts on the explanation of the shipping company on the "Marco Polo" regarding the cause of this marine casualty.
Reminds me on the "Louis Majesty".
« Last Edit: February 15, 2014, 06:55:55 pm by SteKrueBe » Report to moderator   Logged
Phil English
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« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2014, 03:28:20 pm »

This is turning into a pointless discussion over the meaning of the word 'freak'. For God's sake someone died. At the moment, his family are not going to care much for pedantry over the definition of a sea state which caused this tragic incident.

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Phil
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Captain Ted
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« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2014, 03:54:43 pm »

Insurance wise the owners "have" to call it a freak wave, hence abnormal, because otherwise the family of the dead and the injured will have probably cause to question as to why a passenger ship sails into an area of bad weather,,KNOWINGLY.
That the SW coast of the UK experiencing high, abnormal waves in weather conditions like the last week is not new, but as sailor I would neither call it a freak wave. Most probably
these high waves are created by the strong w-bound tide flow and strong NW-SW winds building
up "cross" waves and seas and they can be nasty little critters and damage any kind of ship

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NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
Tuomas Romu
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« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2014, 05:09:32 pm »

Phil, I know that someone died and it is indeed tragic. However, we are not his family. We are the general public who read the news about the incident from BBC. That's why it's okay for us to comment on every aspect of the news instead of just writing meaningless passages about how our prayers are with the deceased.

Of course, it might be possible that the wave that struck the ship was indeed a rogue wave (in which case I stand corrected), but until we get more information I'm inclined to believe that it was just (abnormally) heavy weather.
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Alan Green
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« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2014, 01:51:13 pm »

Further information concerning the incident, courtesy of MSN:

The wife of a man killed after a freak wave hit a cruise ship in the English Channel has criticised the "badly maintained" vessel as she paid tribute to her "lovely husband".

James Swinstead, 85, died "almost instantly" after water rushed on board the British cruise ship Marco Polo as it was battered by waves during severe storms.

The 22,000-tonne vessel, operated by Cruise and Maritime Voyages (CMV), was heading for its home port of Tilbury in Essex at the end of a 42-night voyage when the incident happened on Valentine's Day.

Water crashed through a window, injuring a number of the 735 passengers, who were mainly British.

A female passenger in her 70s was airlifted off the ship, while 14 people were treated for minor injuries.

Mr Swinstead, a father-of-two from Colchester, Essex, was on the cruise with his wife Helen.

Speaking in Tilbury after the ship docked, she said: "I think it killed him almost instantly.

"With our insurance I think I'm entitled to 2,000, which won't even cover getting him home to Colchester.

"I think the shipping company should give some sort of compensation. The ship was badly maintained. Four windows blew.

"I said to my husband, because my father used to make paint, that's going to leak because there was a rusty puddle on the window sill. I expect to hear from the Marco Polo.

"He was a lovely husband.

"The crew have been fantastic. I think the ship is improperly maintained. It had come from Madeira before we got on it in January and they had bad storms then.

"There's so much paint on the outside you can't see the rust, they just slop some more on when they get to port.

"It was quite dreadful. I was sitting next to him and this window came in and the sea with it.

"We were all very, very wet. I think a woman was taken to hospital and my husband was going to get on the helicopter but he died before they could get him on it.

"He's never made headline news. He'll be sitting on his cloud chortling."

The wave caused damage to the ship's Waldorf Restaurant.

The vessel, which has been to the Amazon in South America and to the West Indies, arrived back at Tilbury late last night.

Passengers began disembarking the ship from 7am this morning.

Linda Kogan said: "It was horrendous, I've never been in storms like it. The waves were coming up almost over the ship.

"The ship was at an angle. Some people reported the drawers were falling apart and the wardrobe doors falling off.

"A lady was actually thrown out of bed with the force. We weren't in the restaurant when the windows broke but I think it was really scary.

"One lady said it was just like the films with the foamy water and being swept across the restaurant.

"Some people were stunned but on the whole people were quite stoic. The crew were fantastic. Some of the crew were actually injured as well."

Following the incident, CMV said: "CMV regrets to advise that earlier today their cruise ship m/s Marco Polo, en-route to her home port of Tilbury from the Azores, was hit by a freak wave during adverse sea conditions in the south western approaches of the English Channel.

"One elderly passenger has died and a further passenger has been airlifted for further shore-side medical assistance. The vessel sailed from Tilbury on January 5 and is carrying 735 mainly British passengers and 349 crew.

"Our thoughts are very much with these passengers and their families during this difficult time."

Following repair work, the Marco Polo is due to set sail this evening from Tilbury on a scheduled 14-night cruise to Norway and the Land of the Northern Lights.
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Ian Horsfall
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« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2014, 04:38:21 pm »

Alan , these are not the words of a " Bereaved "woman who has just lost her loving  husband ??.
Sounds more like some Scumbag lawyer chasing her down to sign the paper work.
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Kelvin Davies
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« Reply #13 on: February 16, 2014, 07:05:48 pm »

I just listened to the bereaved lady on BBC radio and I was struck by her ability to remember a "rusty puddle" at a window but she also said she had no idea of the actual injuries to her husband as she had not seen his injuries.
It struck me as rather odd.
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Captain Ted
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« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2014, 01:07:50 am »

@ Derek
good posting
1000,s of vessel passing that area every year, and everytime something happens freak waves and such are the "fault"  As you said,,the sea doesn,t care too much who is in it,s way.
I sail now 40 years and almost 30 as master, and I pretty sure that I had only once in my sea life a freak wave,, and that damaged the ship pretty, bulkheads bend and torn. A freak wavee would have a much more damage to a vessel like this.  Tremendous high seas, combined with w-ly setting tides creating in that area unusual high seas, but no often freak waves.  Freak waves is however the excuse for anything when it goes wrong.
Remember guys,, not 10 years ago when masters/sailors mentioned freak waves,,they were laughed at,, and suddenly they are a daily occurence !!!
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NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
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