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Author Topic: Worst Ship Diasters  (Read 7265 times)
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michaeljordan
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« on: February 13, 2014, 07:34:08 am »

When you ask people about Worst Ship Disaster ,90% of people says its TITANIC.. Even i thought same some time back.. But shocked to see this

The sinking of “RMS Titanic” in 1912, with 1,517 fatalities, is probably the most famous shipwreck, but not the biggest in terms of life lost.

Would you believe if I say 7000+ People lost their lives in 70 mints and its the Worst Maritime Disasters  there are more than 10 Disasters which took 4000+ life's each

I read about The world’s worst naval maritime disasters, but are there any worst disasters than this that are not related to Navy ?

http://www.naval-technology.com/features/featurethe-world-worst-naval-maritime-disasters-4149757/

Guys from now stop saying TITANIC to be the Worst ...
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Timsen
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« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2014, 08:48:07 am »

So what's new about this? Anyone dealing seriously with maritime topics will know that the Titanic was far from being the worst desaster, it only became famous because of the various circumstances. For example take the "Doña Paz" collision with the tanker "Vector" on December 20, 1987, with a death toll of 4.317 which is said to be the worst desaster in peace time.
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steffen B
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« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2014, 11:56:57 am »

Here are some of the world's worst ship Disasters.


MV Wilhelm Gustloff , 1945 - German ship that sank after being hit by Soviet torpedoes . 9,000 were killed - greatest number of deaths in history.

Goya 1945 - The German transport ship was shot down by Soviet torpedoes and sank. 7-8,000 civilians and German soldiers died and only 183 were saved.

MV Doña Paz , 1987 - Philippine passenger ship , collided with an oil tanker . All 4,341 people died.

SS Kiangya 1948 - Chinese steamship which blew up and sank. Uncertainty about the exact number of dead, but the death toll is believed to be between 2,750 and 3,920 .

Le Joola , 2002 - Senegalese ferry that due to too many passengers and storm capsized . More than 1,800 people died.

Toya Maru , 1954 - Japanese passenger ferry that sank during Typhoon Marie . It is estimated that 1,153 people were killed .

Al Salam Boccaccio 98 , 2006 - Egyptian passenger ferry that sank on its way from Saudi Arabia to Egypt. More than 1,000 perished and only 388 survived.

MS Estonia , 1994 - The Estonian ferry that took in water from the Baltic Sea due to problems with the bow doors and sank. 852 died , while only 137 survived.
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J de Nauclér
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« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2014, 12:48:42 am »

WILHELM GUSTLOFF of course - there is Another figure on lost lives: 12 348 - and the large majority consisted of Children, mothers, old people and wounded Soldiers.  It sank in January when the Baltic Sea is around 0 degrees Cold full of ice floating around Before it freeze to a firm flat ice. Most people survived only some 5-10 minutes in that cold icy water.  The guilty criminals for this disaster were of course the fascist dictatorship in Berlin and Gauleiter Koch of Königsberg which until the last hours demanded that these starving Königsberg population should defend the "Fortress Königsberg" (with more or less nothing) according to the Führers demand from Berlin, and the enormous propaganda that the Red Army liberators were "Asian hords and beasts" to kill them all.

To compare TITANIC with the WILHELM GUSTLOFF just doesn't work - these are two very different disasters in magnitude of evil and numbers of innocent inhabitants. The TITANIC disaster was established in petty minds of sneak capitalism and stubborn and by stupid  technoligal immortalness ("the unsinkable Titanic which doesn't need lifeboats") and the GUSTLOFF's psychopathic and evil fascists for whom a Life was noting of value.
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« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2014, 10:32:42 am »

Wilhelm Gustloff  and  Goya
do not belong to "world's worst ship disasters"
because these have not been "disasters" at all...

disaster is something sudden, with very bad consequences (eg. large loss of life), but something which was caused by accident or a chain or a group of combined unfavorable (but not intended) actions / facts / happenings / circumstances

loss of Gustloff and Goya was NOT ACCIDENTAL, NOT NON-INTENDED

these losses were the result of war, of offensive actions (intentional attacks)


also war losses (unless it is really an accident, like friendly-fire) are NOT ACCIDENTS in general / by rule...

if a warship runs aground because of navigation error and during transit and not in direct connection with war action (not under pressure of ongoing fighting, hostile fire) than it migh be an accident (resulting with disaster perhaps)

but if a warship is hit and sunk in fight (during war operations) - then this is not and accident and not a disaster


disaster is a calamity BY ACCIDENT


Gustloff and Goya losses were not caused BY ACCIDENT


« Last Edit: May 30, 2014, 10:49:56 am by polsteam » Report to moderator   Logged

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« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2014, 10:48:26 am »

... and the GUSTLOFF's psychopathic and evil fascists for whom a Life was noting of value.

fascists ?...

Stalin's Russia (Soviet Union) was totalitarian regime (like Hitler's Germany), but communist one, not facsist...  (none of them being better than another - that is whole another story not to be discussed here)

I thought Gustloff was sunk by a torpedo from Russian submarine (not from a German submarine), am I wrong?...
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steffen B
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« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2014, 12:09:47 pm »

Polsteam, in my opinion, is a loss of 7000-9000 human lives a disaster.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2014, 04:48:36 pm by steffen hornshøj » Report to moderator   Logged
Cavit Ege Tulça
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« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2014, 12:45:30 pm »

I found this sad 'ranking' in terms of lost lives: https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xap1/t1.0-9/10373743_257866774399923_8785591991402478829_n.jpg

Though I don't know if the numbers are 100% correct or not.

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steffen B
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« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2014, 03:48:09 pm »

@ Polsteam, I have searched a bit about Wilhelm Gustloff, and I found out that it was sunk by a torpedo from a Russian submarine not a German:)

And thanks to you Cavit Ege Tulça for the interesting but sad link.
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Richard Paton
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« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2014, 07:59:21 pm »

SS General von Steuben was torpedoed in the Baltic in February 1945 with the loss of some 3,500+ souls - i found out whilst identifying her on the Shetland Museum's images page, when she visited Lerwick in peacetime.

Here's some links with many ships still unidentified.

http://photos.shetland-museum.org.uk/index.php?a=wordsearch&s=item&key=Wczo1OiJsaW5lciI7&pg=60

http://photos.shetland-museum.org.uk/index.php?a=wordsearch&s=gallery&key=Wczo1OiJsaW5lciI7&pg=1

Richard
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Kyle Stubbs
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« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2014, 11:49:14 pm »

Unmentioned so far, but likely the worst single maritime disaster of the 19th Century was the loss of the Mississippi River sidewheel steamer SS Sultana on April 27th, 1865 near Memphis, Tennessee.

Lost due to a likely explosion of the boilers, of the 2,427 aboard, mostly prisoners of war returning north, the official US Government loss of life stands at approximately 1800. While the number of dead has never been accurately totaled, it is known that 791 were from the state of Ohio alone, with another 491 from Indiana and 194 from Kentucky. Occurring less than two weeks after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, the event has long been an overshadowed part of both American and maritime history.

More information here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Sultana
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« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2014, 09:25:13 am »

Hi there!
By definition, disasters can also be triggered by war, terrorism or similar events. A general listing of the events with the greatest numbers of losses is in so far quite common. It is nevertheless useful to divide maritime disasters for more accurate classification in civilian disasters and war events.
Against this background, the 'Wilhelm Gustloff' with a loss of 9000-12000 souls is the worst event of a single ship at all - followed by the also war related sinkings of the 'Goya', the 'Junyo Maru', the 'Toyama Maru', the 'Armenija', the 'Ryusei Maru', the 'Tamatsu Maru' and the 'Cap Arcona '.
The worst civilian single event of one vessel is still the sinking of the 'Doña Paz' with 4386 persons lost.
Brgds,
Stefan
« Last Edit: June 12, 2014, 09:32:17 am by SteKrueBe » Report to moderator   Logged
SteKrueBe
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« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2014, 10:47:59 am »

@Kyle: since the number of casualties of the 'Sultana' ranges from 1300 to 1900 one more 19th century maritime desaster with similar high losses should be mentioned - the Chinese junk 'Tek Sing'. She struck a reef in January 1822 on her way from Amoy towards Java. More then 1600 persons died.

Further info at
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tek_Sing
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Jean Hemond
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« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2014, 05:59:31 pm »

 Most of those are the consequences of an act of war! War is a disaster all by itself but there is a human will to  kill thousands of people.

I want to put in evidence the 100th anniversary of one of the major "navigation" error disaster.  That of The Empress of Ireland  was not  under a very large publication for it happened slightly before the 1914 war declaration:   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Empress_of_Ireland
 Cry
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SteKrueBe
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« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2014, 12:19:52 am »

Hi Jean!
The assumption that the definition of a disaster excludes intentionally caused events such as acts of war, in my opinion is not true. Although there are different definitions and one could argue about which one applies - it seems to me the appropriate literature is decisive. For example, Charles Hocking's standard work 'Dictionary of Disasters at Sea During the Age of Steam' published by Lloyd's Register, lists both civilian and wartime shipping losses.
By the way - it seems to me that the reason for michaeljordans threads is mainly to link to various internet sites from a particular vendor, but maybe it's only a coincidence ;-)
« Last Edit: June 13, 2014, 10:06:38 am by SteKrueBe » Report to moderator   Logged
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