ShipSpotting.com
Login: Lost Password? SIGN UP
Ship Photo Search
Advanced Search
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Propeller for 10.000 TEU Maersk-newbuilding ?  (Read 4565 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
portagent
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,168



View Profile WWW
« on: February 18, 2006, 06:45:04 pm »

A propeller weighing 131 tons was shipped via Rostock (German Baltic port) to Maersk-owned Odense Steel Shipyard in Denmark. Capable for a propulsion of about 120.000 HP (88.235 kW) this unit assumingly will be for the first Maersk-vessel with a capacity of more than 10.000 TEU.
Report to moderator   Logged

dead slow ahead !  :-)
best regards, Klaus
Hawkeye
Home away from home
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 241


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2006, 11:52:47 pm »

How big can they get, and where can it go?
I remember a program on the discovery channel about building a container ship, the Arnold Maersk I think, they only just got it out to sea.

Regards
Karl :-)
Report to moderator   Logged
Milind Balaji
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 656



View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2006, 06:05:14 am »

120,000 BHP max output? that is simply AMAZING!Does anyone know when this new blue giant will be launched?
We have Jesper who I think lives pretty close to Lindo shipyard so maybe he can shed some light on this next collossal vessel. Its amazing that Moller is relentless in their pursuit for pioneering vessels, especially conatiner ones in the last 2 decades.

Milind
Report to moderator   Logged

......
Phil English
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,476


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2006, 10:57:30 am »

The next Odense ship (hull 202) is due to be delivered sometime in the 2nd quarter 2006. As ever, Moller are very tight lipped but she is estimated to be around 12,000 teu. However, hull 201 was also anticipated to be one of the new, ultra large series, but turned out to be another 'G' class (Gerd Maersk).

Phil
Report to moderator   Logged
MO Roy
Just can't stay away
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 98


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2006, 08:26:25 pm »

Hi guys,
This new propellor will be for L-203 yard-number newbuilding coming allready halway this year. It will be propelled by a 14RT-flex96 Sulzer main engine (thus 14 cylinder). Extra propulsion power can be added by a schaft-motor. A feature Maersk already applied on their M-serie end 1980thy's.
Yard numeber 202 coming next may will be a "norma" G-class vessel.
Calculated speed will be around 26 knots (service speed).
Roy (Maersk-line)
Report to moderator   Logged
Charles McAllister
Just can't stay away
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 143



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2006, 01:02:15 am »

26 knots service speed?  If I am correct, that is about 20% faster than most large container ships in service.  If fuel consumption is proportionate, the significant increase in speed would enable several more voyages each year (assuming port facilities can handle these vessels).  That alone would seem to encourage building ever larger vessels.  I am not a professional designer, but I know there must be a significant increase in hull length to enable this speed without too large a fuel penalty.  I'm sure there are others here who know more about the economics than I.

Regards,

Charles
Report to moderator   Logged

Best,

Charles
Phil English
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,476


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2006, 03:35:56 pm »

Most modern, large (panamax and post-panamax) containerships have a maximum service speed of around 25 knots. The current series of Maersk 'G' class ships attain 25 knots and I understood that the next series (12,000 teu+) would be designed to attain a similar speed.

Phil
Report to moderator   Logged
portagent
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,168



View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2006, 06:33:03 pm »

No doubt that these vessels can reach speed of 25/26 knots, but having in mind the -presently- extreme high costs for bunkers the technical departments will instruct their ship's commands to sail at economical speed whenever possible. Even carriers schedules are calculated on this basis. If vessels seem to run out of schedule they can compensate time lost by sailing at maximum speed for a while.
Report to moderator   Logged

dead slow ahead !  :-)
best regards, Klaus
Skovgal
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 13


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2006, 03:47:59 pm »

The L203 is expected to leave the yard somewhere around the 4-10 of july. I will make a post if and when I can get more exact information.

Regarding speed:

I do find 25+ realistic since loa is expected to be about 399 meters, however she is more than 55 meters abeam so that talks agains it, but block coefficent could be low. Looks like she got "slimm" lines.  

I took a foto of her last night. See it in the "Shipsfotos" search name "13000+ TEU?"
Report to moderator   Logged

Skovgal
rd77
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1,132


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2006, 07:14:45 pm »

I saw your picture. What a scoop! Thanks for posting!
 
Hull 202, the GEORG MAERSK, will delivered very soon and is expected at the APM terminal Rotterdam 30/5/'06. I will try my best to go and see it.

Brgds.
Report to moderator   Logged

...
tonker
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 17


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2006, 09:15:57 am »

Please excuse me if this question sounds silly, but how does the length of a vessel advantage it`s capable speeds?
Report to moderator   Logged
Charles McAllister
Just can't stay away
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 143



View Profile
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2006, 12:21:44 pm »

Tonker,

This is oversimplified, since other factors can add or detract a bit, but the most significant element of a ship's theoretical maximum speed is "hull speed", which is a factor of the square root of the hull length at or under the surface of the water.  Others here can explain it better than I, but longer ships can go faster than shorter ships, all other things being equal.  Going faster than hull speed involves huge amounts of power, not practical for most merchant ships.
Report to moderator   Logged

Best,

Charles
aquamar

Offline Offline

Posts: 1


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2006, 12:17:39 am »

I think we all can se that there is a return to larger ships in all classes. There is now talk of 12.000 TEU builds. We are even seeing a return to VLCC newbuilds. Our world is demanding these larger vessels in response to growing economies e.g. China. Even private yachts are bigger than ever!                              
              Thanks,
                    jc
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Page created in 0.045 seconds with 20 queries.
Copyright © 2010 All rights reserved