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Author Topic: Costa Concordia Captain  (Read 10558 times)
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Kelvin Davies
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« on: May 19, 2013, 08:39:41 am »

Is this man mad or was he on a different ship in a different place?
The Captain claims he saved the lives of 4,000 people by his actions and that the media have got it all wrong.
The story is headlined here on the home page under Latest News. And the direct link is:
http://maritime-connector.com/news/general/captain-calls-for-new-investigation-into-cruise-wreck/
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kasco
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« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2013, 09:41:07 am »

The lawyers for Captain Schettino offered a plea bargain that he serve 3 years and 4 months for his role in the sinking. This was rejected by the state.
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canberra97
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« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2013, 11:57:38 pm »

With all due respect to the captain though the whole incident could have been alot worse had he not managed to get the ship against the rocky shoreline otherwise I think she could have easliy flipped right over with a huge loss of life but then again he was totally aware of the situation so he should have at least made some attempt to get the passengers ready for a quick abandon ship.

There was obviously severe confusion amongst the officers on the bridge that evening that created the awfull drama that followed.

I follow this very closely and I look forward to the outcome as well of course of the uprighting of the Costa Concordia herself which if you look on YouTube there are various clips recently uploaded showing the salvage operation.
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« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2013, 05:20:07 am »

I am pretty much sure that this captain is responsible for all the 32 deaths in the ship. nd talking about the 4000 saved..that is just insane..i think 20 years imprisonment is quite less for that kind of shameful act.
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SteKrueBe
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« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2013, 06:06:47 am »

With all due respect to the captain though the whole incident could have been alot worse had he not managed to get the ship against the rocky shoreline otherwise I think she could have easliy flipped right over with a huge loss of life but then again he was totally aware of the situation so he should have at least made some attempt to get the passengers ready for a quick abandon ship.

There was obviously severe confusion amongst the officers on the bridge that evening that created the awfull drama that followed.

I follow this very closely and I look forward to the outcome as well of course of the uprighting of the Costa Concordia herself which if you look on YouTube there are various clips recently uploaded showing the salvage operation.

Hi canberra97!
It's true, that the 'Costa Concordia' would have capsized most probably in open water and this could have totalled a way higher number of victims. But it's true also, that the 'Costa Concordia' was without own power for the whole period of time after the incident and that she drifted to her final position solely by random. Furthermore the previous investigations made clear, that the abandon ship procedure was started significantly delayed.
It's not so very much that can be credited as particular merits of the captain in this case.
Brgds,
Stefan
« Last Edit: May 20, 2013, 06:09:15 am by SteKrueBe » Report to moderator   Logged
holedrille
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« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2013, 07:30:46 am »

Canberra97 can not have analysed the plots of the ships track after the allision with the shore. It seems indisputable from them that the ship carried on under the influence of inertia into the open sea where a capsize would have been catastrophic, until the brisk NE wind fortuitously turned her round and she drifted powerless back onto shore. On which the captain jumped ship. How can he claim to have played any part in this? The man is deluded.
Holedriller
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Kelvin Davies
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« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2013, 08:14:34 am »

Quite true.
A recent TV programme here in UK showed, via passenger & crew mobile phone footage, how the company had a PR lady telling the passengers all was well,they merely had a generator failure. At the same time, passengers were starting to abandon ship and the Captain was already ashore!
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« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2013, 02:50:38 pm »

The Captain's grandstanding caused all of this. Instead of taking a course known to be free of hazards, He goes closer to the shore. My guess is, this was not the first ship to pass by the island. Others having done so without peeling their hull open. When the ship first collided, wouldn't it have been prudent to anchor and evaluate the situation and possibly evacuate before the ship drifted out. The Company not wanting to panic the passengers is typical "sweetness & Light" Let's not fret about the inherent dangers that go with being on a vessel at sea, lifeboat drills? maybe tomorrow. Nonchalance shouldn't be the attitude after hitting the rocks.
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Captain Ted
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« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2013, 04:08:58 pm »

I agree that the Captain and also his officers were not really up to the task.
But one also should not forget that those "close pass by,s" are not solely the own doing of the Masters/Officers but also quietly accepted by the companies and the passengers too. Ever heard passengers come back from a trip ? one of the most things you hear,,, OUR CAPT managed to do (this and that)   
That does not excuse any wrong doing (I call it stupidity) of the Capt and/or officers but they are also under pretty high pressure to put on a show !!!!
The point that officers/crew at the beginning downplay a situation is rather normal,,just imagine what goes on if right away it is announced WE SINKNG,,, chaos and panic would be sure and really would hamper any abandon ship effort. When at such a time to give the abandon ship order. No idea on my side,,one has to be there, and I dare to say that 9 of 10
Capt,s agree with me that even they don,t know how they would react or their officers.

The Capt was most probably not up to the job the way it comes out, but one thing either,,which in some comments shines through seemingly,,,a Capt on a pax vessel can not rescue all passengers by himself. He is in the end only as good as the officers supplied to him by the company.
However I fully agree that this Capt screwed pretty much up !!!
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NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
canberra97
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« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2013, 11:45:47 pm »

Canberra97 can not have analysed the plots of the ships track after the allision with the shore. It seems indisputable from them that the ship carried on under the influence of inertia into the open sea where a capsize would have been catastrophic, until the brisk NE wind fortuitously turned her round and she drifted powerless back onto shore. On which the captain jumped ship. How can he claim to have played any part in this? The man is deluded.
Holedriller

Thank you for that information regarding how the NE wind played a part in turning the ship around I was not aware of that so thanks for the mentioning it.
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Kelvin Davies
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« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2013, 10:25:14 am »

Well, the Captain has now been committed for trial beginning July 9th.
He has been charged with dereliction of duty and multiple manslaughter.
The prosecution are asking for 20 years prison.
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Kelvin Davies
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« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2013, 07:05:07 am »

The Italian Ministry of Transport have now published their report on the events, causes, recommendations etc.
Reading this, I think this Captain is in serious trouble, along with the company.
One thing that caught my attention was, after a 53m long section of the hull was ripped open by the rocks, 5 watertight compartments were flooded. This was not surprising, given the ship hit the rocks at 15 knots. What was surprising was how so much machinery was put out of action as a result. Main diesel generators, ballast and bilge pumps were all put out of action. This seems to say that all this critical equipment was located on one side of the ship.
Have a read here: http://maritime-connector.com/documents/Full_Investigation_Report-Costa_Concordia.pdf
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Cedric Hacke
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« Reply #12 on: May 26, 2013, 10:27:53 am »

Wouldn't it be a serious flaw in the ships design if all the critical equipment was located on one side?

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Cedric
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Kai R
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« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2013, 09:05:33 am »

the report states that the ship was in compliance with SOLAS regulations. But obviously those were not sufficient and in fact have been significantly improved with the "safe return to port" concept. New ships wouldn´t suffer such damages but it is very difficult to modernize the old ships to the new standard and it is not mandatory to do so.

Maybe it should be though, too many similar incidents have happened (Carnival Triumph etc.), all resulting in power losses because of concentrated equipment and machinery without redundancies.
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Tuomas Romu
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« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2013, 09:54:25 am »

The main engines are definitely not located on one side only. However, while the ship has two engine rooms, they are separated by a watertight transverse bulkhead. A longitudinal bulkhead running at the centerline could, in theory, result in problems with stability due to asymmetric flooding. For this reason, in ships with four main engines and mechanical tranmission the longitudinal bulkhead between the engine rooms is fireproof but not watertight.

Perhaps the engine rooms should be located further apart with an additional watertight compartment between them? In this way, the probability of flooding both engine rooms would be considerably reduced.
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