ShipSpotting.com
Login: Lost Password? SIGN UP
Ship Photo Search
Advanced Search
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: Maersk B Class- back to the Loch???  (Read 10269 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Judgie
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 13


View Profile
« on: October 25, 2012, 08:44:09 am »

Cheesy Just a bit of tongue and cheek with the title, but there have been a couple of photos surfacing of Boston and Brownsville lately (all recent) in ballast, and of the others carrying comparitively small loads and dropping. What with the current downturn in the Container industry, I think it's reasonable to concur that all six will be in lay-up again quite soon. What say you all? maybe it's time they cut them in half and fit a smaller plant, maybe a slightly larger prop with a lower-rpm "long stroke" diesel, similar concept to the Triple-e's. Or maybe with MARAD's Algol's nee SL-7's getting long in the tooth, these may end up taking their place...

Boston
ShipSpotting.com

Emiliyan

Buffalo
ShipSpotting.com

lappino

Brownsville
ShipSpotting.com

Per Michael Hveisel Hansen


Report to moderator   Logged
Ancient Mariner
Not too shy to talk
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 26


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2012, 07:34:54 pm »

I was on the newbuild team for the Brownsville, and sailed on 2 of her sisters.

Fantastic boats to work and live on. Such a shame that they were built too late for the market they were designed and ordered for.
Report to moderator   Logged
Groovypict
Not too shy to talk
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 33


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2012, 10:56:16 pm »

I agree, I was on the Bentonville for it's first 2 years, lovely ships
Report to moderator   Logged
kyle pesely
Quite a regular
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 44


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2012, 01:55:39 am »

i can only imagine that standing on the bridge wing while the ship is making 30+ knots must be quite an experience(although im sure they never get a chance to see that kind of speed nowadays)

these boats just look as if they want to run as fast as they can to the next port and buck heavy seas with glee. Smiley

although it might be necessary to re-power or otherwise alter their drivetrain to make them last in this market, it will still be a small shame to lose speed demons like these ladies. i mean, dont they top out at something like 36.5 knots??!! thats incredible to me and its amazing that even with 300 tons/day fuel consumption these six ships made it off the drawing boards and into reality.

and now Maersk is stuck with them.

kyle
Report to moderator   Logged
Judgie
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 13


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2012, 10:04:15 am »

Thanks for your replies fellas Smiley

I'm in the RAN and the highest speed i've done is 27knots on an Anzac. I can only imagine what 32 knots on such tonnage (B class) feels like. I admire the design for what it is, a true greyhound of the seas, modern successor to the SL7's and liners of old, using less horsepower to achieve similar results to boot!. Pity they haven't had the chance to make a name. Still trying to get my drawings right on Delftship....
Report to moderator   Logged
ugamskjaer
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 7


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2012, 12:46:10 pm »

Hello All  Smiley

I thought that it was charter vessels and they just could send them back
to owner

Best regards
Ulrik
Report to moderator   Logged
Judgie
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 13


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2012, 12:50:58 pm »

Possible, however we are seeing a fair amount of capacity reduction at the moment across the globe. We'll know in the coming months.
Report to moderator   Logged
ugamskjaer
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 7


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2012, 01:04:33 pm »

Hey  Smiley

I think we will see quiet a lot of ships go to the boyes on the rivers around EU ....
Report to moderator   Logged
alanp
Quite a regular
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 46



View Profile
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2012, 06:13:30 pm »

Here in the UK we are starting to experience gaps in rotations with no reasons given by the shipping lines.
Report to moderator   Logged
ugamskjaer
Just popping in

Offline Offline

Posts: 7


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2012, 07:02:03 pm »

You can suspect Them hiding that were is not enough.boxes to fill the slots !
Report to moderator   Logged
Ancient Mariner
Not too shy to talk
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 26


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2012, 09:29:17 pm »

All of the class had smaller injectors and reprogrammed WEPS systems installed in 2008-2009 to make them more fuel efficient, and more suitable for the slow steaming that was becoming an industry standard.
Always used to be entertaining during my 12-4 afternoon watch, after we had been trundling along at 10kts, to soot blow and go up to 28kts and hurtle past everything. Used to get a few comments over the VHF!

Max sea-trial speed was 32.5kts (on the Buffalo I think). We managed 30kts during ours, but the weather was pretty crappy. Also managed 16kts astern.

They were built for WalMart to be the main customer. The idea was that they could load in China, go through Panama Canal, and discharge on the US East Coast faster than a conventional boxboat could cross Pacific, discharge in LA/SF and trains take the containers to the East Coast.
The theory was sound. At the time they were designed and ordered HFO was around $200 a ton. By the time they started to be built fuel was hitting $600 a ton. And when you burn 300 ton a day at full speed, that's a bloody expensive fuel bill!

Maersk tried all sorts to reduce fuel consumption. We used to sail with a contant head trim. Maersk had commisioned a Danish institute to work out the most efficient trim based on each load condition. Generally it meant a 1.5m trim by the head.
Obviously this complicated fuel uptake, bilge suction, FW suction, closing doors etc.

I have loads of pics of the Brownsville during final stages of construction, and of the Beaumont half way during build (including a few grainy pics of part of the M/E being lowered in) if anyone is interested.
Report to moderator   Logged
kyle pesely
Quite a regular
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 44


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2012, 10:17:52 pm »

AM:
i am DEFINETLY interested in those pictures! the B-boats are really something unique and i find them utterly fascinating, both their story and their technology, and finding good info on them is difficult(unless you can manage to get ahold of someone like yourself, haha). please share them.
Report to moderator   Logged
Kelvin Davies
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4,649


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: November 04, 2012, 03:05:22 am »

Judgie,
I tried standing on the foc'sle of an ex WW2 destroyer making 30 knots round the Cape once. Almost impossible to stand still! It was funny watching the bow wave passing the ship as it was higher than the freeboard and the party of Jenny Wrens sat on deck kept looking at it and throwing up!
The ship was older than me, having been built originally as HMS Wessex and was SAS Jan van Riebeek with the South African navy when I worked on it.
Kelvin
Report to moderator   Logged
Milind Balaji
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 656



View Profile WWW
« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2012, 03:28:51 am »

All of the class had smaller injectors and reprogrammed WEPS systems installed in 2008-2009 to make them more fuel efficient, and more suitable for the slow steaming that was becoming an industry standard.
Always used to be entertaining during my 12-4 afternoon watch, after we had been trundling along at 10kts, to soot blow and go up to 28kts and hurtle past everything. Used to get a few comments over the VHF!

Max sea-trial speed was 32.5kts (on the Buffalo I think). We managed 30kts during ours, but the weather was pretty crappy. Also managed 16kts astern.

They were built for WalMart to be the main customer. The idea was that they could load in China, go through Panama Canal, and discharge on the US East Coast faster than a conventional boxboat could cross Pacific, discharge in LA/SF and trains take the containers to the East Coast.
The theory was sound. At the time they were designed and ordered HFO was around $200 a ton. By the time they started to be built fuel was hitting $600 a ton. And when you burn 300 ton a day at full speed, that's a bloody expensive fuel bill!

Maersk tried all sorts to reduce fuel consumption. We used to sail with a contant head trim. Maersk had commisioned a Danish institute to work out the most efficient trim based on each load condition. Generally it meant a 1.5m trim by the head.
Obviously this complicated fuel uptake, bilge suction, FW suction, closing doors etc.

I have loads of pics of the Brownsville during final stages of construction, and of the Beaumont half way during build (including a few grainy pics of part of the M/E being lowered in) if anyone is interested.

Ancient Mariner - Would love to see you post your B class build pics. Also, we are fortunate to get first hand insight from you on the sea trial experience and also the improvements that APM tried to make on this class of vessel.
Report to moderator   Logged

......
Captain Ted
Top Poster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8,972



View Profile WWW
« Reply #14 on: November 04, 2012, 07:37:35 am »

Can confirm what ANCIENT MARINER said
I put the vessel (bulker) 2-3 feet on the head when I want to make more speed and in bad weather. It really works. The pumping of bilges/tanks etc is difficult, special on bulkers if you have cargo which is wet (Pet-Coke, coal for exmple) and the bilges have to be pumped once or more a day and due to the head trim the water runs to the forward of the holds. (FWD in holds are usually no bilges, might be a thinking point for construction engineers!!!)
Report to moderator   Logged

NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Page created in 0.123 seconds with 19 queries.
Copyright © 2010 All rights reserved