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Author Topic: MSC Flaminia  (Read 42943 times)
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Peter S. aus N
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« Reply #15 on: August 24, 2012, 08:42:18 pm »

Dear stantheman,
which experience do you have in the shipindustrie? are you a master of a vessel of min 5.000 Teu, or at least of a yacht? or do you have only a car driving license  or at least of a tank?
I think there was a master with large experience on board, he was live on the scene, he was not drunken and clear in the mind and you doubt on him?. There was a little fire which costs already 2 lives and an explosion and no one knew if there would be a second which destroy the ship only you knew that all is not so dangerous.It is easy to take the responsibilty from your living room some day after. Do you know what is in the containers-no one knows only you and the sender.
Respect!
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My favorite is the Suezchannel, Panamacannal  and since 2006 also Chinese harbours. I've a lot of pictures and I don't show them because here at shipspotting.com is a copyright problem
Jens Boldt
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« Reply #16 on: August 24, 2012, 09:13:53 pm »

German TV news reported tonight that some of MSC Flaminia's containers are containing toxic, acrid and flammable liquids.

MSC Flaminia now is supposed to be towed to a place some 22 km off Helgoland. There experts will look for sources of fire which might still be active. Furthermore they will check if the fire fighting water aboard is intoxicated etc...

After that (as Peter posted earlier) MSC Flaminia will be towed to Jade-Weser port at Wilhelmshaven.

Cheers

Jens
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stantheman
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« Reply #17 on: August 25, 2012, 12:32:34 am »

Peter, don't get me wrong. I'm not doubting the Captain or his judgement. Just asking a question. Sure he did the right thing by getting the crew off. All I'm saying is that there seems to be some strange things happening with this ship. I mean a German flagged ship being towed around the North Atlantic for how long, almost a month?
There has to be an underlying reason is all I'm saying.
And bye the way, no I'm not currently in the Seafaring trade but have been and have a Father (deceased) and 6 uncles (deceased) who made their living on the North Atlantic. Out of a family of 7 brothers, my Father's family, 5 of the 7 died either in or on salt water. Cry
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Ian Horsfall
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« Reply #18 on: August 25, 2012, 02:16:01 am »

Peter S, Relax "Take a Pill" I have just returned home from  the English Pub  in my 1996 Civic with 2/3 tank of Gas, and I have had my fill of Bud Light,that makes me qualified to talk about any thing Maritime.I dont need no Certificates I read between the lines.
Being an armchair quaterback,
This Captain did not abandon his vsl on the spur of the Moment,with an engine room allledgedly fully working, he had probably made this voyage many times, knowing that these containers had contents that could combust any time and they did . Two possible more seamen
lost there lives may be not from the fire but from the fumes,he was using his Judgement to save the rest of the crew.
 I am sure the salvage Tugs did not send ill equipped personnel on to this ship without testing the air quality first.Lets all hope that this  sad story comes to a  successfull conclusion and no further lives are lost.
Now for one more BUD
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Captain Ted
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« Reply #19 on: August 25, 2012, 10:54:49 am »

stantheman

the underlying thing,,very easy
TOTAL INcOMPETENCE OF AUTHORITIES IN eERY RESPECT,, plus a whole bunch of stupidity on top of it from shore side.  and may be I can tell you a little about it because I sail since 28 years as capt.
Just now,,2 month ago I left the Rio la Plata,,we had to stop engine and check something
we had anchorage abeam montevideo, pilot just off,  and 0.5 nm distance to drop anchor ,,check and repair/keep going
Harbour control denied the request, instead we were direted 22 nm to the east for another anchorage. We made,it but don,t ask how,, I would say 80% od final disasters (Erika and the other famous one off the spanish coast which was towed around until it broke apart !!) caused the disaster after shore authortities denied them help !!!!!!!
 
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NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
kasco
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« Reply #20 on: August 25, 2012, 12:12:12 pm »

Captain Ted

The IMO and ship underwriters have identified the problem with the transport of dangerous goods. The failure of the shipper to properly declare what is loaded in their shipping containers, which leads to wrong stowage of these containers onboard the vessel, has resulted in the lost of many vessels in the last few years. This incident would seem to reinforce the concern of the IMO.

Why is it that none of the numerous regulatory bodies are paying attention to these concerns?


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Kelvin Davies
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« Reply #21 on: August 26, 2012, 01:31:31 pm »

I don't know if anybody noticed but MSC Flaminia's AIS is still working and it is showing up on Marine Traffic approximately 40 miles south of Falmouth.
There are 2 tugs leading; Anglian Sovereign and Fairmount Expedition. Carlo Magno appears to be bringing up the rear, showing Offshore Falmouth as a destination.
Kelvin
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Captain Ted
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« Reply #22 on: August 26, 2012, 03:22:38 pm »

Kasco

very easy

to load a vessel,, special a container ship according to regulation, containers would hve to be opened and inspected before loading,,try that with 2000 of them for a big ship !!!
In other words it,s a cost matter,, and hoping that shippers load the container as per regs. Unfortunately a lot of them take short cuts and declare wrong or less weights. It is a big concern. I remember when I loaded a 2500 TEU ship in 2006 in R-dam,,the draft survey showed that the weight of the containers (cargo) was 800 mt off the decalred !!!
Option,,discharge and re-weight,,,,result: new capt comes if done so !!
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NOW!!!,,,if we could get rid of the sailors,,how safe shipping would be !!!!!!!!
B.Clark
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« Reply #23 on: August 26, 2012, 04:30:34 pm »

Carlo Magno has been in and out of Falmouth a couple of times whilst this incident has been playing out (unfortunately my photo's have been taken from the wrong side of the jetty and are not upto the site's standard for uploading)
« Last Edit: August 26, 2012, 04:32:51 pm by B.Clark » Report to moderator   Logged
Fred Vloo
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« Reply #24 on: August 26, 2012, 11:21:42 pm »

Does anyone know why Carlo Magno, Anglian Earl and Fairmount Expedition are heading south-west again?
After inspection today, it also seems that she is carrying a large amount of Nitromethane.


Cheers Fred
« Last Edit: August 26, 2012, 11:34:07 pm by Fred Vloo » Report to moderator   Logged
Fred Vloo
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« Reply #25 on: August 27, 2012, 12:14:31 am »

Does anyone know why Carlo Magno, Anglian Earl and Fairmount Expedition are heading south-west again?
After inspection today, it also seems that she is carrying a large amount of Nitromethane.

Update: It seems they are riding out a storm.


Cheers Fred
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Kelvin Davies
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« Reply #26 on: August 27, 2012, 04:22:40 am »

It seems they all turned back at 18:00 and this morning are still headed south west.
And they could be heading for a new problem.
On a converging course is Odyssey Explorer, towing a cable.
At the moment, they are about 10 miles apart.
Kelvin
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brimar
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« Reply #27 on: August 27, 2012, 10:28:12 am »

   
Fred.

All daily details of whats happening with the 'MSC Flaminia' Salvage Operation are available on 'MARITIME BULLETIN'

      Has the story got into the Dutch Press/Media? . .as very little has appeared on the Uk Media as yet,especially down here in the SW Region which borders the English Channel which of course we all still have bad memories of the 'MSC Napoli' 
                             
                                Cheer Brian
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Kelvin Davies
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« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2012, 12:01:13 pm »

Hmm,
I used to be a regular reader of the Maritime Bulletin but since reading the MSC Flaminia pages today, I am a little troubled.
At one point, the author claims there is no fire near to the superstructure. The photos in the same report show differently, with fire damage reaching one row of containers before the superstructure.
The same article at one point refers to fatalities among the crew and throughout the July updates tells why the crew were right to abandon the ship. Then, on August 15th, he states as a "fact" that the crew abandoned the vessel without any visible real danger to them or the vessel.
The article in various places demands to know why the vessel is meandering around in circles in the Atlantic. Closer examination of the article show however, that the German authorities want to put a team of specialists on board the vessel to make an inspection/evaluation and mentions that they were delayed because of bad weather (August 25th).
A check on the weather in that area shows there are 20 to 27 knot southerly winds blowing at the moment. I am not a mariner but I am also not sure I would want to try to drag a disabled vessel the size of this one on to what, at Falmouth, would amount to a lee shore.
I think the reports are rather prone to histrionics and seem more focussed on the fate of the cargo on board, rather than the ship or the crew.
Kelvin
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Tuomas Romu
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« Reply #29 on: August 27, 2012, 12:59:33 pm »

As I have pointed out in my previous messages, to me the coverage at Maritime Bulletin seems to be rather biased and the author hell-bent to find some kind of conspiracy or cover-up operation.

If I understood correctly, the crew abandoned the ship after trying to extinguish the fire by themselves. In my opinion, a fire that the crew can not put out by themselves is a good enough reason abandon ship, especially when four persons have already been injured and the ship was carrying two passengers.
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