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 21 
 on: April 21, 2017, 08:48:19 pm 
Started by Hannes van Rijn - Last post by Mick Warrick
Was in the Singapore anchorage a week ago while I was there.

 22 
 on: April 21, 2017, 03:23:23 pm 
Started by Robert J Smith - Last post by Robert J Smith
Hi Bob,

Do you know which one she is ex? Think they were all named after Dickens characters.

Best Regards
John

Hi John,

I can't find any info on her history at the moment. She at Gravesend at the moment.

Regards

Bob

 23 
 on: April 21, 2017, 11:56:00 am 
Started by davidships - Last post by davidships
Anyone able to help with name of this Chinese bulker?

http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/photo.php?lid=2640350

or any others on this page:
http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/search.php?&search_title_option=1&search_category_1=48&search_cat1childs=on&search_country=China&sortkey=p.lid&sortorder=desc&page_limit=12&viewtype=1&mod_page_limit=48

 24 
 on: April 21, 2017, 09:00:07 am 
Started by Robert J Smith - Last post by Allan RO
From their record, I would have no 'Great Expectations' for the service...

Allan

 25 
 on: April 21, 2017, 12:04:14 am 
Started by Robert J Smith - Last post by davidships
She's been around on the Thames as THAMES SWIFT for well over a decade
http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/search.php?query=thames+swift

 26 
 on: April 20, 2017, 01:28:38 pm 
Started by Patalavaca - Last post by Captain Ted
@ Neil D,,, thanks for your post, a side/info which one does not hear, as most only go over how big and more big and such matters and other criterias often just brushed of or neglected.

 27 
 on: April 20, 2017, 01:23:20 pm 
Started by Patalavaca - Last post by Neil D
The Maersk Triple E vessels are a good example of optimising what's possible within the 400m x 59m footprint. The first batch were 18,340 teu but the second batch are 20,568 teu. The second batch has 12 tiers under deck rather than 11 (deeper hull) and the bridge moved further forwards (reducing deck load line of sight restrictions). There's also more lashing framework on deck to allow higher deck stacks. 20-21,000 teu seems to be the absolute maximum you can squeeze into the 400m x 59m footprint.

There are a lot of strong reasons why it's unlikely that we'll see ships significantly bigger than 21,000 teu. My company (Drewry) did some detailed modelling and found that after about 18,000 teu, while the ship costs decline a bit more with bigger ships, the port costs go up, so the overall system cost increases.

Also, a key question is how would shipping lines fill even bigger ships? They already have to work together in just three big alliances to fill the ships they have today. Plus even bigger ships would likely mean even lower service frequency (and it's already declined markedly over the last few years). Shippers would be even less happy than they are today!

 28 
 on: April 19, 2017, 08:46:08 pm 
Started by Robert J Smith - Last post by John Jones
Hi Bob,

Do you know which one she is ex? Think they were all named after Dickens characters.

Best Regards
John

 29 
 on: April 19, 2017, 02:37:55 pm 
Started by Sasha - Last post by Captain Ted
@ davidships

Naaaaaahh,,,, all is said already on that one :-)

 30 
 on: April 19, 2017, 12:00:53 pm 
Started by Sasha - Last post by husni ibrahim nasution
The Turkish-owned Panama-flag ship in question: http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/search.php?query=8727604&x=36
It seems that the ship, of the sea-river Volgo-Balt type, broke in two in stormy conditions. Unlike some other sea-river types this design seems to have been more successful from the structural point of view - only one total loss listed out of well over a hundred in service, and that was a slow capsize after deck cargo shifted.  But I doubt that the ship had been well-maintained in recent years.

The port inspections you mention - under Port State Control - do apply generally and this ship has been visited regularly.  The subjects of individual PSC inspections vary, especially now that they cover the Maritime Labour Convention as well as IMO requirements.  

In the case of GEROI ARSENALA, there were two inspections this year and four in 2016.  Nothing in the list of defect heading concerning ship structure (cracks, rusting, hatch covers etc) but plenty which suggest poor crew management ashore or on-board, or both.  But, as Capt Ted may point out, the quality of PSC inspections also varies enormously from the very focused and well-planned to the cursory, incompetent or corrupt.

Yes..agree. as my know port clearance based on Master Sailing Declaration form..

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