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1  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Too early to determine cause of ships colliding in Welland Canal: TSB on: July 15, 2020, 12:22:41 am
https://www.wellandtribune.ca/news/niagara-region/2020/07/13/too-early-to-determine-cause-of-ships-colliding-in-welland-canal-tsb.html
2  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Montreal :Cargo ship M / V Heloise, collided with Ocean Georgie Bain tugboat on: August 04, 2013, 07:33:19 pm
MONTREAL - Investigators are studying the cause of an aquatic collision between a cargo ship and a tugboat in the city’s port Saturday.
 
Sometime Saturday a cargo ship called the M / V Heloise, collided with the Ocean Georgie Bain tugboat.
 
The Bureau of Transportation Safety Board (TSB) is attempting to determine what caused the incident and a special team of federal agents have been dispatched to study the circumstances of the accident.
 
The Heloise is a 186-metre cargo ship built in 2010, it flies the Panamanian flag.
 
There was no word on injures but emergency services were not required


Read more: http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/investigators-studying-crash-between-cargo-ship-and-tugboat-1.1397604#ixzz2b1x4hzbM
3  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: LOUIS JOLLIET aground near l'Île-d'Orléans on: May 16, 2013, 11:52:08 pm
http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justice-et-affaires-criminelles/faits-divers/201305/16/01-4651633-le-louis-jolliet-sechoue-pres-de-lile-dorleans.php#Slide-9-box-0

Lien sur l'incident du Louis Jolliet
4  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: ATHABASKAN being towed to Halifax on: January 04, 2013, 04:58:34 pm
Thursday, January 3, 2013


 

HMCS Athabaskan - yes there's more



Three new updates:
 
1. The RCN held a press conference today in which they stated that an engineering team had been dispatched to North Sydney to assess the condition of the ship before it is towed on to Halifax.
 They also said that weather would determine when the tow might take place.
 
2. But just to add to the litany of issues surrounding this incident word has reached me that the tow entered, departed and re-entered Sydney harbour without benefit of pilotage. This would certainly contravene the Pilotage Regulations, since Sydney harbour is a mandatory pilotage port.
   There was an incident in Halifax a couple of years ago when a visiting French warship was advised by someone in the RCN that it did not require a civilian pilot because "we never use them". Canadian warships, under command of specially trained officers, are not required to employ a civilian pilot  in Halifax and with certain specific qualifications (but foreign naval ships are required to.)
 Canadian ships over 1,500 gross tons (except ferries on their normal routes, and some other minor exceptions) are required to have a pilot in compulsory pilotage areas. Canadian government ships are not required to have a pilot. I assume however that they mean that the ship is under command.
   Exceptions to the pilotage Regulations can be made if the ship is in distress, if it is seeking refuge or if no pilot is available. However as I understand it the Atlantic Pilotage Authority must issue a waiver first.
 
An unmanned Canadian warship under tow would require a pilot in Sydney, if my reading of the regulations is correct, since it is over 1,500 tons.

3. The tugs Atlantic Fir and Atlantic Elm have arrived in Sydney, but apparently on spec. since the Department of Public Works and Government Services may have to re-tender the towing job. The Groupe Océan tugs Océan Delta and André H. have sailed and are on their way home.

http://shipfax.blogspot.ca/2013/01/hmcs-athabaskan-yes-theres-more.html
5  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: ATHABASKAN being towed to Halifax on: January 04, 2013, 12:42:49 am
HMCS Athabaskan - docked in North Sydney "indefinitely"






 1. Safe in North Sydney [photo used with permission].
 
 CCGS Sir William Alexander** (left) did not have a line aboard the ship at one any time. The tug Ocean Delta (at the end of the dock) did eventually recover the tow, after calling in air support, and they did reach Sydney Harbour.
 
Strangely muted comments by some official sources are underplaying the seriousness of HMCS Athabaskan's abruptly abbreviated trip from St.Catharines toward Halifax. They say it was never in danger of running aground on Scatarie Island. I would say that if your only alternative was to call in air support from Greenwood air base, then there was good reason to fear that the ship would run aground or sink before you reconnected the tow.
 Now that it is safely berthed in Halifax {North Sydney!} the spokespersons are saying that they are waiting for good weather to complete the journey. If the ship were a merchant ship, the Department of Transport's Ship Safety inspectors would hold the ship in port until repairs were made.
 However this is complicated, because repairs to navy ships are very different to what would be possible in a remote port with a merchant ship.Temporary repairs would permit a merchant ship to be cleared to sail to a port where permanent repairs could be made. Even though the ship is tied up at the Canadian Coast Guard Academy's College's dock in Point Edward I doubt civilian regulators will be anywhere near this one except on an advisory basis.The navy will be the ultimate decision makers on when and under what circumstances the tow resumes. (The dock is in North Sydney, not at the Coast Guard College)
 Since the construction of naval ships is far different from merchant ships, even the type of temporary patching that could be done in Sydney might not be acceptable. However the navy can be creative and they may find a way to make the ship seaworthy. Normal damage control measures (applied in combat situations) could get the ship to a safe port, but with no navy crew on board and no ship's power, would these be possible? Stuffing a few mattresses in the holes and shoring then up with timber might have worked for Hornblower, but I'm not sure it will fly here.
No matter how they solve that problem, there is going to be a big repair bill ahead.
 


2. Hull perforations, indentations, scrapes and bruises. [photo used with permission]
 


I can see up to eight possible perforations, which could be open to the sea (granted the ones I can see are above the waterline). These would certainly result in additional damage if not patched before sailing. More serious in the long term is a long scrape that has clearly distorted some plates, and likely damaged frames. Then there are all the dents, bumps and scrapes that may have caused additional damage.
 Officials say they are keeping a close eye on weather before the ship moves, but my guess is that it may take more than good weather before this ship reaches Halifax.   
Interesting that the tug Ocean Delta is still alongside.Perhaps Groupe Océan has not been fired after all. I hope not - it would seem only fair to allow them to complete job. And what other tug operator would want to take over a previously damaged tow? Most towing contracts are quite firm in taking no responsibility for the towed object short of gross negligence verging on sabotage, so Océan may well be in the clear.
 Tugs will have to recover their towing line, several hundred feet of which is still attached to the ship, and will sail for Quebec as soon as January 3.
** conflicting reports here - some say the Coast Guard did and some say it did not have a line aboard. I have nosworn testimonials on this, but would prefer to believe that they did NOT.
 The ship shown in the picture is CCGS Sir William Alexander, however other photos (which I have not published) show that it was CCGS Edwrad Cornwallis that was the ships one the scene after the tow line parted.
 
http://shipfax.blogspot.ca/2012/12/hmcs-athabaskan-docked-in-sydney.html?showComment=1357054338726
6  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: ATHABASKAN being towed to Halifax on: January 03, 2013, 04:18:00 pm
HMCS Athabaskan hull damaged in tow line break
 
Holes, dents, scrapes can be seen on Iroquois-class destroyer
The hull of the Royal Canadian Navy ship HMCS Athabaskan was damaged when it broke loose from its tow line last week and went adrift off Scatarie Island in Cape Breton, CBC News has learned.
 
The Iroquois-class destroyer, which is currently docked in North Sydney, has at least seven holes in its hull along with several dents and scrapes. It also appears the ship's frame may be warped along the waterline.
 
The Royal Canadian Navy declined to comment to CBC News about the extent of the damage.
 
HMCS Athabaskan was in St. Catharines, Ont., for a refit and was on its way to Halifax for the winter when it went adrift on Friday night.
 
The tow line to the 130-metre vessel was reconnected with the help of a Cormorant helicopter from the airbase in Greenwood, N.S.
 
There was no one on the ship at the time of the incident.
 
HMCS Athabaskan went adrift off the same island where the bulk carrier MV Miner went aground in September 2011.
 
The MV Miner was on its way to Europe when the tow line snapped. The rusting ship is still beached off Scatarie Island despite several attempts to refloat it.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2013/01/02/ns-hmcs-athabaskan-damage.html?cmp=rss
7  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: ATHABASKAN being towed to Halifax on: December 30, 2012, 09:56:03 pm
..

HMCS Athabaskan breaks free of towline

HMCS Athabaskan is towed into Sydney harbour to wait out bad weather.

 
The Canadian navy ship HMCS Athabaskan broke loose from its towline Friday night and went adrift off Scatarie Island in Cape Breton, CBC News has learned.
 
Capt. Doug Keirstead, a spokesman for Maritime Forces Atlantic, said there was no one on the ship at the time, but there were people on the tug.
 
He said the line was reconnected with the help of a Cormorant helicopter from the airbase in Greenwood, N.S.
 
"One of the crew members who was on the tug was lowered down to Athabaskan to reconnect the line, as was a member of the tug's crew," Keirstead told CBC News on Sunday.
 
Athabaskan was in St. Catharines, Ont., for a refit. It was on its way to Halifax for the winter when it went adrift.
 
Once the line was reconnected, the ship was towed to Sydney to wait out the current winter storm. It's not known when it will resume the journey to Halifax.
 
HMCS Athabaskan went adrift off the same island where the bulk carrier MV Miner went aground in September 2010.
 
MV Miner was on its way to Europe when the towline snapped. The rusting ship is still beached off Scatarie Island despite several attempts to refloat it.
 
The Cape Breton community of Main a Dieu is hosting a summit next month to look for ways to get MV Miner scrapped and removed.
..
8  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: Xmas Greetings on: December 22, 2012, 03:36:42 pm
Best wishes on the occasion of the Noel 2012 and the best photos in all "Shipspotters" following the river Saint Lawrence and somewhere else in the world for year 2013. Better greetings Phil De Fayre
9  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / The Baie St. Paul, CSL's New Trillium Class Laker Arrives in Port of Montreal, C on: December 11, 2012, 04:54:05 pm

The Baie St. Paul, CSL's New Trillium Class Laker Arrives in Port of Montreal, Completing Maiden Voyage


 MONTREAL, Dec. 4, 2012 /CNW Telbec/ - Canada Steamship Lines is proud to announce the arrival of the MV Baie St. Paul, the most technologically advanced ship to enter the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway system. The award-winning vessel docked in the Port of Montreal, Quebec at 20:30 EDT on December 1, 2012, completing her maiden voyage that began in Jiangyin, China.
 
"We are extremely proud of and grateful to the talented officers and crew of the Baie St. Paul who successfully navigated a vessel built for the Lakes across the Pacific Ocean and through the Panama Canal," said Louis Martel, President of Canada Steamship Lines.
 
"The Baie St. Paul represents an important milestone for CSL and for the evolution of shipping in the Great Lakes.  Her outstanding environmental and operational performance is a testimony to CSL's ongoing commitment to customers and the communities in which we operate."
 
The first of four new Trillium Class self-unloading Lakers, the vessel named the "Bulk Ship of the Year 2012" by the International Bulk Journal is currently undergoing alterations to remove the temporary reinforcing structures that made possible her ocean passage. The Baie St. Paul will then be deployed immediately for service.
 
Employing leading-edge technology, the Baie St. Paul and all Trillium Class vessels will set new standards in operational and environmental performance, energy efficiency and reliability.
 
Canada Steamship Lines is a division of The CSL Group, the world's largest owner and operator of self-unloading vessels. Headquartered in Montreal with divisions based in the United States, the United Kingdom, Norway, Singapore and Australia, The CSL Group delivers more than 80 million tonnes of cargo annually for customers in the construction, steel, energy and agri-food sectors. Trillium Class is a trademark of The CSL Group.
 
SOURCE: Le Groupe CSL Inc.
10  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: Tundra Aground in St Lawerence River on: November 29, 2012, 07:13:00 pm
SOREL-TRACY, Que. - A cargo ship ran aground on the banks of the St. Lawrence River near Sorel-Tracy in the Monteregie region of Quebec just a few hours after leaving Montreal on Wednesday.

The freighter, registered as Tundra,(IMO 9415208) had weighed anchor in the late afternoon, leaving the Port of Montreal en route to Halifax.

Transport Canada's Marine Division has been called to the site to investigate what took place.

Nathalie Letendre, a spokesperson for the Canadian Coast Guard, confirmed that the Cyprus-registered vessel was carrying soya.

The cause of the grounding and the reason why the freighter moved out of the shipping channel are still unconfirmed.

"It's not a water level question, as they had all the data they needed," she said.

"The investigation will reaveal what is the problem. Maybe something broke aboard."

No environmental issues are expected and there were no injuries reported.

Following Transport Canada's investigation, the captain of the freighter will be responsible for refloating the boat.

"It is responsibility of the ship owners to refloat the boat," said Letendre. "After the investigation, which will be conducted Thursday morning, the ship owners will present their options for re-floating their boat.
 
The cargo ship remains grounded several metres from shore.
 
"The boat is stuck in the mud, so the worst thing they can face is the suction from the mud posing a problem."


Read it on Global News: Global News | Cargo ship carrying soy beans grounded in St. Lawrence River
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