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1  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: Erie Shipbuilding Begins Work on: December 10, 2005, 07:42:42 pm
"The shipbuilder's first job will be to convert the Buckeye into an articulated tug barge, said John Chapman, vice president of operations and director of engineering for the company.

"He said the Buckeye's stern will be cut off and reconfigured so the 138-foot-long Olive L. Moore will fit into the barge. That will allow them to operate as a single unit, Chapman said."

It's interesting that they're converting the ancient Olive L. Moore (1928) for that ATB. I guess there's some life in the old girl yet! :-D Of course steel ships do last better in the Lakes...

John
2  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: W. H. RAGLAND on: November 22, 2005, 04:21:52 am
A couple more shots of the Ragland:

http://www.shipspotting.com/modules/myalbum/photo.php?lid=143163

http://www.shipspotting.com/modules/myalbum/photo.php?lid=143164

and for Bent, here are a few the moderators here might not like :-):

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jkohnen/sets/1418485/

John
3  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: W. H. RAGLAND on: November 21, 2005, 06:37:43 am
The W. N. Ragland is now owned by rock star Neil Young and is based in the Port Townsend, Washington area. She's currently hauled out at the Port Townsend shipyard getting several planks replaced. Mr. Young could afford some beautiful wood for those planks! :-D I've taken several photos of the Ragland, but it'll take a little while to dig them up. In the meantime, here's one of her in the shipyard a couple of weeks ago:

http://www.shipspotting.com/modules/myalbum/photo.php?lid=142794

John
4  Shipspotters all over the world / Trip reports / Inside Passage Cruise by Landing Craft on: November 18, 2005, 01:50:48 am
I got back last week from a short cruise among the islands and inlets of British Columbia aboard a 135' landing craft. The ship delivers supplies to places that don't have good docks and also carries up to twelve passengers. We visited places the "real" cruise ships don't go near, and when we wanted to go ashore all we had to do was find a beach to run the ship onto. :-) It was wonderful! :-D I'll be posting some of the photos I took of vessels I encountered, but you can see a bunch of less ship-oriented shots here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jkohnen/sets/1376123/

The outfit that runs the ship is:

http://www.marinelinktours.com/

John
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