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1  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: Another Thames tug on: November 08, 2018, 10:24:44 pm
The Hawk is the sister to the Svitzer Amazonas, already drydocked so I believe so heading straight to Avonmouth to join the fleet.

John
2  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: Does anyone know what type of ship is it? on: September 04, 2018, 06:00:39 pm
I sailed on two of them, fantastic vessels!
3  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: Dutch tug INNOVATION on: August 02, 2018, 09:56:01 am
Hi Robert, I believe kotug have bought it. I think svitzer have been using it for training purposes but that is due to come to an end within coming weeks. Kotug will then take it permanently.

Regards,
John
4  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: Asian vs Western Tug Designs. on: April 30, 2018, 12:15:47 pm
Hi Judgie,

As a skipper of both designs I will give you a few of my thoughts.

Firstly, the contract that the vessels are built for is important.  For example, think of the Svitzer tugs in Milford Haven.  They were built as terminal tugs to escort and work in push pull mode.  Therefore they have very rounded bows.  This was designed this way as calculations of pressure and heat distribution per square inch were calculated when pushing up on the LNG vessels.  The skeg as you rightly noted allows the escort mode of operation which in an oil and gas port they are required to do. 

The Japanese hull form however makes them a much much better sea boat.  There is probably a disadvantage to pushing with such a narrow bow, but the flare makes the tug cut through a sea much more comfortably than a round bow. A tug built to service one port wont need the same coastal steaming qualities as one that may have to travel.

Next point to consider is who is living there.  Take a Damen 2411 for instance. Fantastic tugs but really a "day boat".  Crews go home after a relatively small stay.  Other tugs have accomodation for up to 6 persons 24/7 and this then determines size.  Tugs that work in harbour systems will always be smaller than tugs designed for terminal work as they need to fit around tight corners etc.

Some tugs are a mixture of both.  My current vessel is a Robert Allan design but has Niigata controls, engines, gearboxes, clutches and units.  This makes her a fantastic vessel to handle, but where my company needed a higher bollard pull they had to look at different engine manufacturers for other tugs of the same class.

If you look at what tugs the UK were building in the 1970's and then look at what Japan were building they were miles ahead.  We had twin screw and they had ASD.  That ASD design has evolved into modern day standards but the overall tug is much the same.  A ship owner wont go spending money on a tug which is equipped both structurally and stability wise for escorting if its not needed.  The japanese tug seems favourable but if he can have it built in Europe more cheaply then that will overrule the Japanese design.  If the Japanese tug cant provide the required bollard pull then again the shipowner will look elsewhere.

Cheers,

John
5  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Strange goings on in the Java Sea on: November 16, 2016, 05:25:55 pm
Hi guys just found this......


Im struggling to find a motive (scrap value maybe but surely cost to do such a thing would override this) and apart from that how could such an operation be done so secretively unless it was naval?

Never mind the disrespect for what these wrecks are.....war graves.

Any thoughts as to how and why???

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-37997640

Cheers,

John
6  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: Celebrity Infinity slams into Ketchikan Dock 06/03/16 on: June 05, 2016, 04:37:54 pm
Alongside fore and aft!  Huh Shocked
7  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: SAFMARINE MERU ablaze following collision with NORTHERN JASPER on: May 13, 2016, 10:21:47 pm
Well how can it be proven if the OOW knew the rules?

By an oral exam he/she passed. Not much use now is it?

I meant an AID like TCAS and regular simulator sessions so as to improve the standard that is out there now. We can't turn back time and re-train these people from day one, but if we can build in a higher level of redundancy going forward then surely this would be safer?

I agree that many of the college courses and cattle farms of officer production lines are wholey inadequate. I should know I went to one! You have a mix of sub standard courses built on tonnage tax etc and young men and women who are maybe not adequate for the job. ( not all, some) 3 years later you get a sub standard officer with a sub standard education but a college and shipping company who are quids in. I agree, wrong motives=wrong outcome.

Unless the fundamentals of business change its going to take a mighty leap for necessary changes to take place.

John

If someone truly knows the rules inside out (word perfect) to start with and is examined on them constantly as a cadet both at sea and at college and then in Orals, then they stick with you for life. So they should, as they are absolutely fundamental and the overriding component of the job of any OOW.
You keep using that word aid. You should know as well as I do that any of the grand systems you refer (which don't exist) will never be used merely as an aid, they will be in fact be relied upon by the idiots out there. Accordingly I'm very resistant to anything that will take their eye off the ball even more.

Again Malim I agree with you, (hopefully) most of us out there know the rules, inside out. But one thing this case as with many others have shown, is that people work towards their certificates pass them and then incidents happen. This shows that the knowledge that should be there isn't. Now that's either down to the individual or the education process that got them there. Tricky I know as the rules are the rules you either know and understand them or you don't. So the next question is, how do you ensure these officers do know the rules and continue to hold their knowledge? Like Malim says it should be second nature but in many cases it obviously isn't. There most certainly is an over reliance on navigation aids. Your eyeballs are the first tools you should use along with your ears. The rules of the road were not written with electronic gadgetry in mind.

Maybe it should be minimised,  but what is left should be there as a safety measure to support the OOW not as something that gives irrelevant information and makes 101 distracting noises?
8  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: SAFMARINE MERU ablaze following collision with NORTHERN JASPER on: May 13, 2016, 09:59:03 pm
Well how can it be proven if the OOW knew the rules?

By an oral exam he/she passed. Not much use now is it?

I meant an AID like TCAS and regular simulator sessions so as to improve the standard that is out there now. We can't turn back time and re-train these people from day one, but if we can build in a higher level of redundancy going forward then surely this would be safer?

I agree that many of the college courses and cattle farms of officer production lines are wholey inadequate. I should know I went to one! You have a mix of sub standard courses built on tonnage tax etc and young men and women who are maybe not adequate for the job. ( not all, some) 3 years later you get a sub standard officer with a sub standard education but a college and shipping company who are quids in. I agree, wrong motives=wrong outcome.

Unless the fundamentals of business change its going to take a mighty leap for necessary changes to take place.

John
9  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: SAFMARINE MERU ablaze following collision with NORTHERN JASPER on: May 13, 2016, 08:00:31 pm
To be fair I think every person who has added to this thread each has a point which could be considered. Maybe it's time for the shipping industry to look at all angles rather than to continue down this path. Looking at other industries and their evolution may also be beneficial.

Technology of course is not a bad thing, but maybe it's not being utilised within the industry to full effect?
For example the company I work for has a different type of electronic chart system for almost every type of vessel. Each one has a different specification and some of which are so completely inaccurate that one would never trust such a system in certain navigational situations. Therefore with equipment like this, the only thing to do IS to look out of the window.

Whereas on with other systems I would cross reference with the electronic AIDS. This unfortunately means there is no standard.
I am also very interested in the aviation industry. Lots can be learnt here.
Regular simulator rides could be a steady way of continuing competence in particular circumstances. Those course of this nature I have been on were excellent. Putting one under pressure and strain and learning about yourself and how you react in a situation can be a steep curve.
TCAS (traffic collision avoidance system) is an automated response by the aircraft to the pilot in command. Warning them of aircraft nearby. A similar system which interprets rule of the road and perhaps provides an option could be useful. Yes this may take skills away, but for all those incidents that do happen like the one in this thread then maybe they could be avoided. I have no doubt that the OOW on the bridges of these two vessels knew the rules, but maybe assistance from a marine standard TCAS could have avoided an incident like this completely. A system like that may well have provided an alternative to the poor decision made.

Just a thought,

John
10  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: SAFMARINE MERU ablaze following collision with NORTHERN JASPER on: May 12, 2016, 10:47:25 am
Why Gerry would you question the abilities of today's sailors? Was your ability questioned by ex seafarers when you were at sea?

At the end of the day, incidents have, do and will happen and as most people know an incident is just a result of a series of breakdowns.
Yes some sailors are better than others and of course some are far more experienced. But until we know all of the findings of the said incident it is unfair to put blame solely on one sailor. Upon hearing of a plane crash the flight crew aren't immediately blamed. Failures leading up to what may or may not be pilot error are attributed and looked at for their significance beforehand. This could have been a total breakdown in bridge resource management or simple communication breakdown by a team of people.

It's not fair or appropriate I feel to question a sailors ability unless the facts are known and that to generalise the ability of 'modern sailors' as a whole is wrong. As I've  said before, it comes down to the person to an extent, but also the training colleges and courses, the crew as a team and even the employer and working conditions.

John
11  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: SAFMARINE MERU ablaze following collision with NORTHERN JASPER on: May 10, 2016, 06:44:48 pm
As much as I agree with your sentiments Ted and see it as much as you do, it's important to note that not every person on the bridge of a vessel chooses to go about his or her work in this way. Yes unfortunately as a generalisation it is a common practice, but should be noted that it is still the exception not the rule.

John
12  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: SAFMARINE MERU ablaze following collision with NORTHERN JASPER on: May 10, 2016, 03:48:18 pm
In my limited, but valid experience. I find that those seafarers coming fresh out of college can be split into two types. Those that want to be there and those that are there because they want the money or to see the world. I joined the merchant navy as a young man who wanted to go to sea, who was proud to wear the uniform, who wanted to be apart of the history. There are others like me who have an interest at what we do.

Unfortunately some out there do it for the money or lifestyle. These people jump through the college hoops and once out in the big wide world struggle as they have paid little interest into their profession other than what they needed to pass an exam. Once on the bridge in a real situation the college structure is useless. That interest and learning that should have been carried through isn't there and these young officers struggle. Relying on computer screens which are only useful if you have been bothered to learn to understand them and again have an interest in it.

This lack of or wrong type of motivation to do the job, I feel is a fundamental reason as to why safety in the job sometimes falls down. Yes accidents can and do happen and we can all make bad decisions. But I feel the quality of person as a professional on the bridge can be scrutinised further than what tickets they hold. You have to look at the person as a person not a ticket.

That little extra I feel makes a hell of a difference when it comes down to who you want to navigate your vessel for 8 hours plus a day.

John
13  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: Norman Arrow? on: April 15, 2012, 05:11:43 pm
Interesting!!

Thanks for the information I will take a look.

Regards

14  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: Norman Arrow? on: April 12, 2012, 10:18:25 pm
Hi guys, whilst on this subject although slightly different.... does anybody know what has happened to the Norman Bridge?  I see her AIS says that she has headed east and gone to Singapore, but does anybody know who has bought her and what route(s) she will be undertaking? I sailed on her as a cadet when she was the "Blanca Del Mar".
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