ShipSpotting.com
Login: Lost Password? SIGN UP
Ship Photo Search
Advanced Search
  Show Posts
Pages: [1]
1  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: CSCL / COSCON 22,000 teu ships on: April 20, 2017, 01:23:20 pm
The Maersk Triple E vessels are a good example of optimising what's possible within the 400m x 59m footprint. The first batch were 18,340 teu but the second batch are 20,568 teu. The second batch has 12 tiers under deck rather than 11 (deeper hull) and the bridge moved further forwards (reducing deck load line of sight restrictions). There's also more lashing framework on deck to allow higher deck stacks. 20-21,000 teu seems to be the absolute maximum you can squeeze into the 400m x 59m footprint.

There are a lot of strong reasons why it's unlikely that we'll see ships significantly bigger than 21,000 teu. My company (Drewry) did some detailed modelling and found that after about 18,000 teu, while the ship costs decline a bit more with bigger ships, the port costs go up, so the overall system cost increases.

Also, a key question is how would shipping lines fill even bigger ships? They already have to work together in just three big alliances to fill the ships they have today. Plus even bigger ships would likely mean even lower service frequency (and it's already declined markedly over the last few years). Shippers would be even less happy than they are today!
2  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: CSCL / COSCON 22,000 teu ships on: April 18, 2017, 10:16:21 am
I'd be very surprised if the 400 metre long barrier is broken. All of the very big container ships on order fall within the 400m long x 59m beam limits. Ports and terminals have invested and adapted on the basis of 400m max vessel lengths and going beyond this will cause significant issues for many places.

What is happening is that designers are finding ways to squeeze greater teu intakes into the 400m x 59m shape. For example a 12th layer of boxes on deck (empties only) adds about 1,000 teu.

The 6 vessels that Cosco China Shipping has on order from the Waigaoqiao yard have a stated capacity of just under 21,000 teu.
3  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: P3 gets U.S. regulators approval !! on: March 23, 2014, 04:38:23 pm
Regardless of what the regulators decide, the fact is that Maersk, MSC and CMA-CGM have to get approval for the P3 - there's no way of filling their very large ships without operational co-operation. The pressure is on for the other alliances to expand to match the P3, both in terms of numbers of lines being members, and in terms of geographical scope. Evergreen is joining the CKYH on the Asia-Europe route, the G6 is seeking permission to expand to cover the Transatlantic and Transpacific. What will China Shipping and UASC do I wonder?
4  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: Hamburg Sud new ships at Tilbury: on: March 23, 2014, 04:32:13 pm
Interesting to see these very large ships calling at Tilbury, albeit only for a few calls before moving down river. Tilbury's riverside berths have a minimum depth of 13.7 metres and cranes with a max outreach of 18 boxes.

Diver Shoal in the river channel off Gravesend though is the key restriction, with just 8-9 metres at low water. Of course you can add 5-6 metres tide to this but using London Gateway allows a longer access window and more flexibility in arrival and departure times.

Also the vessels can be loaded down to their marks if required (although with multi-port calling in Northern Europe the actual draft per port call depends where the vessel is in the port rotation).

It seems clear that Tilbury will concentrate mainly on short sea and feeder business going forwards.
5  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: SVENDBORG MAERSK on: February 18, 2014, 04:17:44 pm
More details and photo can be found here: http://www.vesselfinder.com/news/1840-Svendborg-Maersk-lost-50-containers
6  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: London Gateway on: February 11, 2014, 02:33:54 pm
Thanks Phil. Yes, the crane outreaches and alongside depth at Northfleet Hope mean that the 9,600 teu HS ships could only be accommodated if not on max draft (or only by sitting on the berth around high water which is impractical) and only if stowed a certain way. Not impossible but not preferable either when there is an alternative just down the river without these issues - you can see why the decision was made. Plus there is also the draft limitation of Diver Shoal off Gravesend isn't there.
7  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: London Gateway on: February 11, 2014, 11:18:19 am
Yes, I saw this news item too, but Tilbury has seen the Sovereign Maersk (10,500 teu) at TCS in the past (albeit a one-off call I think). So in theory the new Hamburg Sud vessels could still be accommodated at TCS, but of course at London Gateway the tidal access restrictions are significantly less.
8  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: MSC RITA on: February 09, 2014, 12:21:04 pm
Yes, this vessel is on CSAV's IMEX 1 Mid East/Indian Sub Con service which normally calls at Felixstowe. I think CSAV operates the service jointly with MSC.
9  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: London Gateway on: January 27, 2014, 10:16:36 am
I agree re Southampton. SCT is a 51% stake in a leased terminal (with a finite time length) for DPW whereas London Gateway is 100% ownership of a freehold terminal (with a huge logistics park too). If push comes to shove, London Gateway is naturally DPW's preference over Southampton. But if they can win business from Felixstowe rather than Southampton, of course that would be preferable for them.

What is clear though is that London Gateway wants to (and has to) win a range of services. It's no good just having Far East services. They need the full set of east-west and north-south services in order to serve cargo owners' needs. Hence why Hamburg Sud, even though it's a relatively small volume, is important.

Yes, certainly more shake outs to come in terms of the big ship services. The P3 Alliance (assuming it gets regulatory approval) appears to be going for Felixstowe and Southampton but as you say, this may well cause others to seek preferential berthing at London Gateway.

What happens with the G6, CKYH, Evergreen, CSCL and UASC over the next few months will be very interesting!
10  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: London Gateway Doubles Container Lift Capacity on: January 27, 2014, 10:05:53 am
Sorry, yes, you are right. I had 2014 in my head but thought of it as "next year" !!
11  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: London Gateway Doubles Container Lift Capacity on: January 26, 2014, 04:48:10 pm
The overall UK deep sea container market isn't growing that much, partly because the UK economy is still quite flat, but also because its a mature economy and so its a mature container market. You get growth of a few per cent p.a. and not double digits.

The big thing though is that whilst the overall volumes aren't growing much, they are coming in much bigger ships - and yes, there aren't that many berths in the UK able to take the 13,000 teu+ sized vessels. This will be a big factor in pushing customers with Far East services to London Gateway. But don't forget that Southampton will be adding another deep berth next year and at Felixstowe they are extending Berths 8/9 to be able to take two ULCVs at once.

So there won't be a shortage of the very deep berths in the UK, but at the same time there won't be way too many. The tricky thing though is that the berths that were in the past used for Far East services (and which are now not deep enough/don't have big enough cranes) will be under-utilised.
12  Shipspotters all over the world / Shipping News and information / Re: London Gateway on: January 26, 2014, 04:37:22 pm
It is a simple fact that new ports don't generate new import-export container traffic. The UK market is what it is, with its overall size driven by macro economic factors, and so yes, London Gateway has to win market share from other UK ports.

The list of where to win it from is a very short one: Felixstowe, Southampton and Tilbury (with Thamesport already out of the deep sea business now). DP World is the majority shareholder at Southampton Container Terminal and so may be less inclined to try and take business from there, and its sale of its shareholding at Tilbury Container Services certainly meant that there would be no qualms in taking business from Tilbury.

However, the north-south trades served by the likes of SAECS and Hamburg Sud are actually quite small in volume terms. SAECS and Hamburg Sud together are probably no more than 150-200,000 teu p.a. but London Gateway's first phase capacity is 1.6 million teu p.a. - so they have to win some of the big volume Far East customers - and these are at Felixstowe and Southampton.
Pages: [1]

Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Page created in 0.049 seconds with 20 queries.
Copyright © 2010 All rights reserved