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Author Topic: Quadcopter (drone)  (Read 5186 times)
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jadran
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« on: August 23, 2015, 02:13:01 pm »



Hello to experts, and also to all the site members who know a bit about drones !

I am curious to learn:
When you buy a drone, and later intend to use it for flying and shooting photos, are there necessary to obtain any special licence, permits and/or any other official document(s) from the various authorities.

Moreover, are there existing any official restrictions for flying the drone i.e. any limitations and/or any "prohibition".

To simplify my query ... is flying a drone, for the purpose of photographing, the same as flying some toy-heli or is a drone entering into category of a flying object (like some light sport-plane, glider, paraglider and similar).

Thank you in advance.
Jadran


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Captain Ted
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« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2015, 04:24:31 pm »

HI JADRAN

here in the US drones are more and more estricted,,for example the drone is not allowed to leave the EYE SIGHT of the operator.
Can not be flown withhin X-miles of airports and such and not above a certain height.
There re various more restrictions, like they have now a indentification numbers and if they
enter a restricted area they can be shut down, a kind of AIS.
A few other things are in the works.  A lot of close encounters are reported by airline pilots
and when the first passenger air plane with 300 peoples is down with all dead than the free wheeling as it began is most probably over and
one has to file a "kind of flight plan" which airline pilots have to do today always.
Guess comes all with it,, but at present I would say,,every country/port /facility most probably will have their own restrictions and regulation !!!

brgds
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jadran
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« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2015, 05:06:19 pm »


Thank you Captain Ted !

As I can briefly understand (out of records) the drones are still treated as a TOY-HELI.

But I wonder, and can not even imagine, what the captain of the ship & officers on watch think to themselves when they see a drone "zooming like crazy" around their ship !???

Can this distract the captain/officers on watch when their ship is entering/leaving the port (being just at the breakwater or on any other close distance to the pier) when their whole attention must be focused, and only focused, on navigation of the ship and the objects & traffic in vicinity of the ship (and not onto the drone in any case).
Hmm,, doesn't sound good to me .................

Best regards,
Jadran


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Captain Ted
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« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2015, 05:34:49 pm »

hi Jadran

Personaly I would not like to have a drone buzzing around the vessel
special not on approaches. I mean since ISPS was invented everything is about terrorism
and prevention, ports were closed, sailors treated and criminals and now virtually anyone can buy a drone and fly it somewhere around. What happens for example whn a sailor has a drone or a captain flies it
into the port to look arounbd and back out !!!! and all that with no regulations whatsoever.
You can see that it is a gray/balck/shady area on a large scale !!!!
I heard for example the danish gov does now control vessels engine emissions in the Belt area by
drones,,virtually flying them over the funnel area and "sniffing" and analysing the exhaust to make
sure the vessels using the correct fuel.
There are countless possibilities and with no regulation it will be the wild west and major accidents will happen, just a mater of time !!!!

Just imagine, from my previous post a airliner comes down because a drone flies into her engines !!!


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Emmanuel.L
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« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2015, 06:22:32 pm »

Apart from the danger involved in flying these drones near airports and sensitive areas such as military bases , prisons etc.. there is the question of privacy, there goes sunbathing in the nude on one's own roof.It will be a serious breach of privacy to fly one of these drones over a high villa wall to spy on someone swimming in Adam natural swimsuit, so  I will deem it legit to shoot down these flying peeping toms. I will if  I will ever have a villa with a pool. Even residents in high balconies and windows in high rise buildings are a victims to these spydrones.
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Clyde Dickens
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« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2015, 09:38:13 pm »

It is an issue that must be addressed.  Here is the current Jun 9, 2015 Australian official view:

Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) is preparing to relax restrictions on the use of small drones by commercial operators.

The organisation has been working with industry since mid last year on proposed changes to laws governing unmanned aeronautical activities.

CASA undertook a risk assessment of remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) weighing less than 2 kilos to determine whether to allow commercial operators of the small drones to fly without a license, and found there was no safety risk.

“The general consensus is that RPA with a gross weight of two kilograms and below have a very low kinetic energy, pose very little risk to aviation and have a low potential for harm to people and property on the ground and other airspace users,” the authority said at the time.

Under the changes, operators of the small commercial drones will be able to fly the devices without a certificate as long as they do so within certain parameters.

The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operators will need to fly the aircraft outside controlled airspace and restricted areas, be more than 5 km from the boundary of an airport, and maintain a direct line of site with the aircraft.

Operators will only be allowed to fly over non-populous areas, no less than 30m away from anyone else involved in operating the aircraft, and cannot fly the aircarft any more than 400ft above the ground, and fly during daylight hours only.

Previously only recreational users could fly drones without a licence.

CASA spokesperson Peter Gibson today told iTnews the authority expected to formalise the new rules later this year, for implementation in 2016.

It's the first time the RPA rules have been reviewed since they were implemented in 2002, he said.



Read more: http://www.itnews.com.au/News/405002,casa-prepares-to-introduce-new-drone-rules.aspx#ixzz3jfzkWyhf

See links on left for more info.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2015, 10:28:26 pm by Clyde Dickens » Report to moderator   Logged

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« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2015, 11:42:00 pm »

at Emmanuelle

Exactly my line,,I would shoot it down and I have a house with a pool in the back

brgds
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« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2015, 11:45:23 pm »

@ Clyde
looks like more or less the US line on the same matter.
brgds
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Owen Foley
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« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2015, 03:06:21 am »

Jadran .. best to check with your country's civil aviation authority for their rules.
In many countries (but not all) you can fly and photograph for recreational purposes without a licence as long as you follow their safety guidelines.

To correct a few misconceptions .. the popular drones are the size of a seagull and unless the flyer is doing crazy things, the ship's crew probably wouldn't even notice it when you are photographing.

And these things are the world's worst spy devices.  With an extreme wideangle lens, flashing LEDs and a sound like 100000 killer bees, you can't sneak up on anyone or get recognisable photos of a person without them knowing well be fore you would be in range.  If you are concerned about privacy, drones come way, way down the list with mobile phones, cameras, binoculars etc etc 100 times more effective for spying.

I suspect that at least some of the rash of recent sightings by airline pilots are not recreational drones at all.  The reports rarely give any details but when they do, many are definitely not the common quadcopters and are more likely to be birds, balloons, other planes, Venus or any other thing that used to cause UFO reports.

On the positive side, a drone is just magic for ship photography.
It opens up so many angles and perspectives that weren't possible without hiring a helicopter.
Tanker or car carrier looks boring?
Just get some elevation and show a little deck detail and water on both sides of the ship and it lifts your photos.
Sun on the wrong side of your ship?
No problem ... just zip across to the other side and shoot with the sun instead of against it.

« Last Edit: August 24, 2015, 03:11:22 am by Owen Foley » Report to moderator   Logged
pieter melissen
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« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2015, 05:16:22 am »

Owen, how long do your batteries last?
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Tuomas Romu
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« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2015, 05:24:37 am »

I agree with Owen. Our drone (DJI Inspire 1) has bright red and green lights, but unless you knew exactly where to look (and sometimes even then), it was next to impossible to spot it in daylight if it was a bit further out. We mainly flew it using the video link and while we went somewhat close to other ships as well, no-one ever called us on radio and asked what it was. Also, while the buzzing was pretty loud, you couldn't hear it in the bridge even when we flew just outside the bridge windows.

As for being naked and so on, what's the big freaking deal?

Pieter, we got about 15 minutes of flight time (indicated) in Arctic conditions, but always took the drone down after 10 minutes or so. While the captain was more than willing to stop the ship when we had minor problems with compass etc. (a few times, over open water), it would have been annoying to walk on the ice and fetch the drone after emergency landing, especially since we didn't have rifles...
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Emmanuel.L
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« Reply #11 on: August 24, 2015, 05:43:29 am »

Hi Owen, every new invention presents problems being new and no regulations or laws have not been enacted to the limitation of their use, if no regulations are not set, anarchy in their use will prevail. Think of the paparazzi hounding politicians, royalty etc. with these drones.!
I can think of a number of unlawful things that can be done with these things.
If they are not used according to laws and regulations they will get a bad name and a wonderful invention in the hands of someone with malicious intentions  will play havoc with  this wonderful invention.
As to sound, recently whilst with my friends at the seashore observing shipping in harbour ,we only became aware of one practically over our heads by its shadow, as there was a  breeze   the sound did not carry over to us.
Remember it is how you use it, a knife  can cut bread but it can also wound or kill.
regards.


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« Reply #12 on: August 24, 2015, 08:34:36 am »

Hi Emmanuel

I am sure many governments are aware of the issues.  Note the recognition of the possibility that drones may be misused by government agencies.

Whatever is decided the drone devices will become more efficient and used by more people.

See Inquiry finds drones a threat to citizen privacy

A House of Representatives committee investigating the emerging use of drones has urged the Australian Government to introduce legislation which would protect citizens from “privacy-invasive technologies”.

The seven-month inquiry [pdf] was tasked with determining whether regulation was keeping up with the rapid adoption of emerging technologies such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

It found that drones had the potential to be misused, both by the general public as well as law enforcement operators, due to complexities and gaps in the existing regulatory framework.

The problem will be exacerbated as unregulated, consumer-grade remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) become cheaper and more advanced, the inquiry concluded.

Read more: http://www.itnews.com.au/News/389628,inquiry-finds-drones-a-threat-to-citizen-privacy.aspx#ixzz3jigIzK4ENew laws required.


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« Last Edit: August 24, 2015, 08:37:43 am by Clyde Dickens » Report to moderator   Logged

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« Reply #13 on: August 24, 2015, 02:17:50 pm »

Pieter .. i get a reliable 20 minutes per battery.

The whole privacy issue really is a myth put out by people that know nothing of these things and probably based on what they think they might do with what they imagine the capabilities are.
They really are no threat to privacy - but many other technologies may be..
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Bob Scott
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« Reply #14 on: August 24, 2015, 04:00:43 pm »

I think I can confidently predict that, in a few years' time, probably following an accident or incident involving a drone flown by a private individual, there will be a further legal clampdown on these 'toys' and that some form of pilot's licence will become required to operate them
« Last Edit: August 24, 2015, 04:31:53 pm by mumbles » Report to moderator   Logged
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